The Pleasure of Punishment

The Pleasure of Punishment

Author: Magnus Hörnqvist

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429589614

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 613

Based on a reading of contemporary philosophical arguments, this book accounts for how punishment has provided audiences with pleasure in different historical contexts. Watching tragedies, contemplating hell, attending executions, or imagining prisons have generated pleasure, according to contemporary observers, in ancient Greece, in medieval Catholic Europe, in the early-modern absolutist states, and in the post-1968 Western world. The pleasure was often judged morally problematic, and raised questions about which desires were satisfied, and what the enjoyment was like. This book offers a research synthesis that ties together existing work on the pleasure of punishment. It considers how the shared joys of punishment gradually disappeared from the public view at a precise historic conjuncture, and explores whether arguments about the carnivalesque character of cruelty can provide support for the continued existence of penal pleasure. Towards the end of this book, the reader will discover, if willing to go along and follow desire to places which are full of pain and suffering, that deeply entwined with the desire for punishment, there is also the desire for social justice. An accessible and compelling read, this book will appeal to students and scholars of criminology, sociology, philosophy and all those interested in the pleasures of punishment.

The Will to Punish

The Will to Punish

Author: Didier Fassin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190888596

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 508

Over the last few decades, most societies have become more repressive, their laws more relentless, their magistrates more inflexible, independently of the evolution of crime. In The Will to Punish, using an approach both genealogical and ethnographic, distinguished anthropologist Didier Fassin addresses the major issues raised by this punitive moment through an inquiry into the very foundations of punishment. What is punishment? Why punish? Who is punished? Through these three questions, he initiates a critical dialogue with moral philosophy and legal theory on the definition, the justification and the distribution of punishment. Discussing various historical and national contexts, mobilizing a ten-year research program on police, justice and prison, and taking up the legacy of Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucault, he shows that the link between crime and punishment is an historical artifact, that the response to crime has not always been the infliction of pain, that punishment does not only proceed from rational logics used to legitimize it, that more severity in sentencing often means increasing social inequality before the law, and that the question, "What should be punished?" always comes down to the questions "Whom do we deem punishable?" and "Whom do we want to be spared?" Going against a triumphant penal populism, this investigation proposes a salutary revision of the presuppositions that nourish the passion for punishing and invites to rethink the place of punishment in the contemporary world. The theses developed in the volume are discussed by criminologist David Garland, historian Rebecca McLennan, and sociologist Bruce Western, to whom Didier Fassin responds in a short essay.

George Kateb

George Kateb

Author: John Seery

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317600299

Category: Political Science

Page: 263

View: 819

George Kateb’s writings have been innovatory in exploring the fundamental quandary of how modern democracy—sovereignty vested in the many—might nevertheless protect, respect, promote, even celebrate the singular, albeit ordinary individual. His essays, often leading to unexpected results, have focused on many inter-related topics: rights, representation, constitutionalism, war, evil, extinction, punishment, privacy, patriotism, and more. This book focuses in particular on his thought in three key areas: Dignity These essays exhibit the breadth and complexity of Kateb’s notion of dignity and outline some implications for political theory. Rather than a solely moral approach to the theory of human rights, he elaborates a human-dignity rationale for the very worth of the human species Morality Here Kateb challenges the position that moral considerations are often too demanding to have a place in the rough-and-tumble of modern politics and political analysis. Rejecting common justifications for the propriety of punishment, he insists that state-based punishment is a perplexing moral problem that cannot be allayed by repairing to theories of state legitimacy. Individuality These essays gather some of Kateb’s rejoinders and correctives to common conceptions and customary critiques of the theory of democratic individuality. He explains that Locke’s hesitations and religious backtracking are instructive, perhaps as precursors for the ways in which vestigial beliefs can still cloud moral reasoning.

Morality

Morality

Author: Bernard Gert

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195122565

Category: Philosophy

Page: 426

View: 457

For more than thirty years, philosopher Bernard Gert has been developing and refining his distinctive and comprehensive moral theory. His classic work, The Moral Rules: A New Rational Foundation for Morality, was first published in 1970. In 1988, Oxford published a fourth revision titled Morality: A New Justification of the Moral Rules. In this final revision, Gert has produced the fullest and most sophisticated account of this influential theoretical model. Here, he makes clear that morality is an informal system that does not provide unique answers to every moral question but does always limit the range of morally acceptable options, and so explains why some moral disagreements cannot be resolved. The importance placed on the moral ideals also makes clear that the moral rules are only one part of the moral system. A chapter that is devoted to justifying violations of the rules illustrates how the moral rules are embedded in the system and cannot be adequately understood independently of it. The chapter on reasons includes a new account of what makes one reason better than another and elucidates the complex hybrid nature of rationality. Although Gert's moral theory is sophisticated, it is presented with a clarity that enables it to serve as an excellent introduction for beginning philosophy students, as well as fruitful reading for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses. Unlike most moral theories, his account of morality is developed in sufficient detail to be useful to those interested in problems of applied ethics. This book will appeal to those engaged in business ethics, engineering ethics, environmental ethics, and especially medical ethics. In the manner of the works of Thomas Hobbes and John Stuart Mill, this book addresses the general philosophical reader and at the same time makes an important contribution to the philosophical literature.

Textbook on Criminology

Textbook on Criminology

Author: Katherine S. Williams

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199592708

Category: Social Science

Page: 679

View: 973

This text offers an engaging and wide-ranging account of crime and criminology. It provides a clear and comprehensive consideration of the theoretical, practical, and political aspects of the subject, including the influence of physical, biological, psychological, and social factors on criminality.

The Forgotten Gospels and Epistles of the Original New Testament

The Forgotten Gospels and Epistles of the Original New Testament

Author: Various

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: EAN:4064066384807

Category: Bibles

Page: 307

View: 672

The Forgotten Gospels and Epistles of the Original New Testament are a number of writings by early Christians that give accounts of Jesus and his teachings, the nature of God, or the teachings of his apostles and of their lives. Some of these writings have been cited as scripture by early Christians but since the fifth century, a widespread consensus has emerged limiting the New Testament to the 27 books of the modern canon. This book presents the complete forbidden gospels and epistles: Mary Protevangelion Infancy Infancy (Young Childhood) Nicodemus Christ and Abgarus Laodiceans Paul and Seneca Acts of Paul and Thecla Clement Barnabas Ephesians Magnesians Trallians Romans Philadelphians Smyrnaeans Polycarp Philippians Hermas—Visions Hermas—Commands Hermas—Similitudes

Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment

Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Publisher: Gildan Media LLC aka G&D Media

ISBN: 9781722524784

Category: Fiction

Page: 474

View: 268

Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student living in Saint Petersburg who feels compelled to rob and murder Alyona Ivanovna, an elderly pawn broker and money lender. Raskolnikov believes with the money he steals he could liberate himself from poverty and perform great deeds. After much deliberation, he sneaks into her apartment and commits the murder. In the chaos that ensues, he fails to steal anything valuable, which was the primary purpose of his actions. Although the murder and robbery are bungled, Raskolnikov escapes without being seen and seems to have committed the perfect crime. There’s one devastating hitch: the feverish delirium of his own conscience. Raskolnikov is racked with guilt over the crime and worries excessively about being discovered. His ethical justifications disintegrate as he confronts the real-world moral consequences of his deed. Racked with confusion, paranoia, and disgust for what he’s done, he falls into a feverish state as his guilt manifests itself in physical ways. His actions grow increasingly strange as if subconsciously, he wants to be discovered. When suspicion falls on him, he’s faced with the decision of how he can atone for his terrible crime so he can find psychological relief. As usual in Dostoyevsky’s work, he brilliantly explores the psychology of his characters for a deeper understanding of their motivation and conflict central to the human condition. First published in 1866, Crime and Punishment is one of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s most famous novels, and regarded as one of the true masterpieces of world literature.

Civilization and Barbarism

Civilization and Barbarism

Author: Graeme R. Newman

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 9781438478135

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 148

Challenges the established corrections paradigm and argues for replacing mass incarceration with a viable and more humane alternative. The practice of mass incarceration has come under increasing criticism by criminologists and corrections experts who, nevertheless, find themselves at a loss when it comes to offering credible, practical, and humane alternatives. In Civilization and Barbarism, Graeme R. Newman argues this impasse has arisen from a refusal to confront the original essence of punishment, namely, that in some sense it must be painful. He begins with an exposition of the traditional philosophical justifications for punishment and then provides a history of criminal punishment. He shows how, over time, the West abandoned short-term corporal punishment in favor of longer-term incarceration, justifying a massive bureaucratic prison complex as scientific and civilized. Newman compels the reader to confront the biases embedded in this model and the impossibility of defending prisons as a civilized form of punishment. A groundbreaking work that challenges the received wisdom of "corrections," Civilization and Barbarism asks readers to reconsider moderate corporal punishment as an alternative to prison and, for the most serious offenders, forms of incapacitation without prison. The book also features two helpful appendixes: a list of debating points, with common criticisms and their rebuttals, and a chronology of civilized punishments. Graeme R. Newman is Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the School of Criminal Justice, University at Albany, State University of New York. His many books include Punishment and Privilege, Second Edition; Community Policing in Indigenous Communities (coedited with Mahesh K. Nalla); and the four-volume Crime and Punishment around the World, for which he served as general editor.

An Introduction to Criminological Theory

An Introduction to Criminological Theory

Author: Marilyn McShane

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135632731

Category: Reference

Page: 311

View: 250

First Published in 1997. This is a book about the different ways in which crime and criminal behaviour has been explained in modern times. It will be seen that there are different explanations - or theories - which have been proposed at various times during the past 200 years by among others legal philosophers, biologists, psychologists, sociologists and political scientists.