Scotland Highlands & Islands Footprint Handbook

Scotland Highlands & Islands Footprint Handbook

Author: Alan Murphy

Publisher: Footprint Travel Guides

ISBN: 9781909268623

Category: Travel

Page: 496

View: 888

When the rain stops falling and the mist clears there is no more beautiful place on earth than Scotland’s Highlands and Islands. Footprint’s Scotland Highlands & Islands gives you everything you need to get the most out of Europe’s last great wilderness: the loveliest glens and lochs, the spookiest places, the most evocative castles and most glorious beaches. • Great coverage of all the jaw-dropping scenery including national parks, mountains, castles, glens and lochs. • Comprehensive listings from B&Bs, bothies and baronial castles to where to enjoy a wee dram of malt whiskey • Loaded with information and suggestions on how to get off the beaten track, from puffin-spotting to horse riding • It includes fantastic mapping and inspiring color section to help you plan your way around the vibrant cities, stunning highlands and hundreds of islands. Footprint’s fully updated Scotland Highlands & Islands is packed with all the information you need to get the best out of this breathtaking region.

Cowal Way

Cowal Way

Author: Michael Kaufmann

Publisher:

ISBN: 1898481741

Category: Travel

Page: 72

View: 431

The Cowal Way is a waymarked trail running for 57 miles (92 km) across the rugged Cowal peninsula, an unspoiled area of the Highlands just west of Glasgow. It is best walked from Portavadie on Loch Fyne to finish at Inveruglas on Loch Lomond. The Way has some rugged scenery, the walk is easily broken into manageable sections, and it offers glorious views over Loch Fyne, the Isle of Bute and the Firth of Clyde. The Cowal Way links with both the Kintyre Way (by ferry from Portavadie) and the West Highland Way (by water bus from Inveruglas), creating scope for Scotland's ultimate long-distance walk. This is a fully revised version of the first edition, with new large-scale Footprint mapping and updated text and photos. It contains everything you need to plan and enjoy a holiday: *details of each section, showing distance, terrain and food/drink stops *background on Cowal's history and heritage, habitats and wildlife *planning information for transport and accommodation *feature on the historic Isle of Bute *lavishly illustrated, with over 80 colour photographs *8 pages of detailed route mapping at 1:50,000 *rucksack-friendly format, printed on rainproof paper.

Loch Lomond & Cowal Way

Loch Lomond & Cowal Way

Author: James McLuckie

Publisher:

ISBN: 1898481857

Category: Bute, Island of (Scotland)

Page: 72

View: 663

"Lavishly illustrated guidebook with route map plus practical information" - Scots Magazine The Loch Lomond & Cowal Way runs for 57 miles (91 km) across the Cowal peninsula, which lies west of Glasgow and is easily reached by public transport, road and ferry. The route starts at Portavadie on Loch Fyne and ends at Inveruglas on Loch Lomond. The trail is waymarked and undulating, with rugged terrain and glorious views over the Isle of Bute and the Firth of Clyde. The area is rich in history and heritage, with wildlife sightings including red squirrel, red deer and golden eagle. Cowal has ferry links to Bute, to Kintyre and across Loch Lomond to join the West Highland Way. It's the missing link that enables Scotland's ultimate long-distance walk, from Kintyre all the way to Inverness. In November 2018 the route's name was extended to Loch Lomond & Cowal Way to reflect the fact that over 50% of it runs within the Loch Lomond & Trossachs National Park. This new guidebook celebrates that name and contains many new photographs. However, it is a successor to the previous guidebook Cowal Way (second edition, 2016) which documented the same route.

Scotland For Dummies

Scotland For Dummies

Author: Barry Shelby

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470486832

Category: Travel

Page: 458

View: 779

Enjoy sightseeing and shopping in bustling Edinburgh and Glasgow or explore unspoiled scenery and welcoming towns in the Hebridean Islands, Southern Scotland, Tayside, and the Northeast. Go from the Highlands to the Lowlands. Hike, canoe, or just relax at Loch Lomand. This friendly guide gives you the scoop on: Edinburgh Old Town, with its intriguing winding alleyways Accommodations that range from sumptuous 17th century hotel furnished with Gothic antiques to a secluded seaside escape, and from a 17th century laird’s house to a sleek, modern and minimalist hotel Enjoying a pint of lager in a rustic pub where the barmen wear kilts and you don’t tip or touring distinctive distilleries Cathedrals, castles and historic sites like the Calanais Standing Stones (the "Scottish Stonehenge"), Edinburgh Castle that holds the historic Stone of Destiny and Scotland’s crown jewels, Doune Castle, made famous by the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and Glasgow Cathedral Storied golf courses such as Muirfield, Royal Troon, and St. Andrews in the country credited with developing the sport Touring Sir Walter Scott’s mansion, Abbotsford, with it’s incredible library, relics, and mementos, or paying homage to poet Robert Burns at numerous sites Shopping for everything from fine wool knits to Caithness glass paper weights to Edinburgh Crystal to tartans and kilts to Highland Stoneware Like every For Dummies travel guide, Scotland For Dummies, 5th Edition includes: Down-to-earth trip-planning advice What you shouldn’t miss — and what you can skip The best hotels and restaurants for every budget Whether you’re looking for fun nightlife or the legendary Loch Ness monster…whether you want to explore art galleries and museums or walk craggy seacoasts, this guide gives you the flavor of Scotland so enchantingly you can almost hear the bagpipes.

Western Ferries

Western Ferries

Author: Roy Pedersen

Publisher: Birlinn

ISBN: 9780857908636

Category: Transportation

Page: 216

View: 133

In the late 1960s, drawing on Scandinavian experience, Western Ferries pioneered roll-on roll off ferry operations in Scotland's West Highlands and Islands. This innovative company's original focus, was Islay, where its hitherto undreamt of frequency of service transformed that island's access to the outside world. The company's profitable and efficient operation was, however, deliberately sabotaged by heavily subsidised predatory pricing by the feather-bedded state owned competitor. This shameful policy, initiated at the highest political level, has been uncovered by recently released official correspondence held in the Scottish archives. The Islay service eventually succumbed, but the company's service across the Firth of Clyde between Inverclyde and Cowal, not only survived, but, in the face of many challenges, flourished to become by far Scotland's busiest and most profitable ferry route. Its modern cherry red ferries run like clockwork, from early till late, 365 days a year, employing some 60 people locally. It contributes much back into the community it serves including free emergency runs, whenever required, in the middle of the night. What made all this possible was the extraordinary dedication of a succession of enthusiastic, determined and above all colourful individuals. This is their story.