The Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary

The Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary

Author: Geoff Tibballs

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 9781529103922

Category: Humor

Page: 0

View: 823

The classic pocket guide to the language of London. This wonderful little guide to cockney rhyming slang contains over 1,700 old and new rhymes translated from Cockney to English and English to Cockney, including: Custard and jelly - telly Hot cross bun - nun Lemon tart - smart Rock ’n’ roll - dole Sticky toffee - coffee ...and many more. Master the art of the Cockney rhyme and discover the Cockney origins of common British phrases.

The Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary

The Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary

Author: Geoff Tibballs

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473566873

Category: Humor

Page: 128

View: 499

The classic pocket guide to the language of London. This wonderful little guide to cockney rhyming slang contains over 1,700 old and new rhymes translated from Cockney to English and English to Cockney, including: Custard and jelly - telly Hot cross bun - nun Lemon tart - smart Rock ’n’ roll - dole Sticky toffee - coffee ...and many more. Master the art of the Cockney rhyme and discover the Cockney origins of common British phrases.

The Ridiculously Comprehensive Dictionary of British Slang

The Ridiculously Comprehensive Dictionary of British Slang

Author: Ian Hall

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1532949553

Category:

Page: 216

View: 561

Slang has been in use for as long as men have used a spoken language. In using slang, Britain is no different, but perhaps the isolation of our Island Fortress has allowed us to accumulate more than its fair share. So... ...whether you are researching a novel ...or perhaps just want to understand British television better ...or maybe you're just a trivia junkie The source of your motivation doesn't matter... this book is for you! English slang, Scottish slang, Regional slang, Cockney Rhyming slang. We've got it all covered. And no useless filler either! With almost 200 pages of definitions we get straight to the point... slang. So don't be a plonker, stop fannying around, and get yourself a copy.

A Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

A Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

Author: Julian Franklyn

Publisher: Routledge & Kegan Paul Books

ISBN: UCSC:32106016311455

Category: English language

Page: 232

View: 576

This re-issue of Julian Franklyn's classic dictionary not only defines these expressions but also explains their origin and history. An introductory essay examines the roots and development of rhyming slang. Although many people assume that rhyming slang is exclusively Cockney, Franklyn illustrates how it is common to Australian and Americn dialects. From the unlikely to the bizarre, the 1,500 entries both entertain and enlighten. Cartoons enliven a reference section which combines linguistic detail and cultural analysis. Whether reading the dictionary from cover to cover, or dipping into it as a reference tool, linguists and students of popular culture will find it the definitive source of information on rhyming slang.

A History of Cant and Slang Dictionaries

A History of Cant and Slang Dictionaries

Author: Julie Coleman

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191563584

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 520

View: 369

This book continues Julie Coleman's acclaimed history of dictionaries of English slang and cant. It describes the increasingly systematic and scholarly way in which such terms were recorded and classified in the UK, the USA, Australia, and elsewhere, and the huge growth in the publication of and public appetite for dictionaries, glossaries, and guides to the distinctive vocabularies of different social groups, classes, districts, regions, and nations. Dr Coleman describes the origins of words and phrases and explores their history. By copious example she shows how they cast light on everyday life across the globe - from settlers in Canada and Australia and cockneys in London to gang-members in New York and soldiers fighting in the Boer and First World Wars - as well as on the operations of the narcotics trade and the entertainment business and the lives of those attending American colleges and British public schools. The slang lexicographers were a colourful bunch. Those featured in this book include spiritualists, aristocrats, socialists, journalists, psychiatrists, school-boys, criminals, hoboes, police officers, and a serial bigamist. One provided the inspiration for Robert Lewis Stevenson's Long John Silver. Another was allegedly killed by a pork pie. Julie Coleman's account will interest historians of language, crime, poverty, sexuality, and the criminal underworld.

Cockney Rhyming Slang: A Politically Incorrect Guide

Cockney Rhyming Slang: A Politically Incorrect Guide

Author: Ian Hall

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 1729228283

Category: Reference

Page: 360

View: 792

Perhaps the most comprehensive dictionary of rhyming slang ever undertaken!And as slang sometimes takes the place of 'rude' words, it's ALL in here!Thousands of rhyming slang phrases... History of the whole rhyming slang idea... Trivia and spoken examples of EVERY rhyming phrase...This is more than a dictionary; it's an inexhaustible supply of information for years to come.The PERFECT stocking filler for the Brit-nut in your life or the best reference book you could buy for your world linguist.

Adventuring in Dictionaries

Adventuring in Dictionaries

Author: John Considine

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443826266

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 395

View: 679

Adventuring in Dictionaries: New Studies in the History of Lexicography brings together seventeen papers on the making of dictionaries from the sixteenth century to the present day. The first five treat English and French lexicography in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Heberto Fernandez and Monique Cormier discuss the outside matter of French–English bilingual dictionaries; Kusujiro Miyoshi re-assesses the influence of Robert Cawdrey; John Considine uncovers the biography of Henry Cockeram; Antonella Amatuzzi discusses Pierre Borel’s use of his predecessors; and Fredric Dolezal investigates multi-word units in the dictionary of John Wilkins and William Lloyd. Linda Mitchell’s account of dictionaries as behaviour guides in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries leads on to Giovanni Iamartino’s presentation of words associated with women in the dictionary of Samuel Johnson, and Thora Van Male’s of the ornaments in the Encyclopédie. Nineteenth-century and subsequent topics are treated by Anatoly Liberman on the growth of the English etymological dictionary; Julie Coleman on dictionaries of rhyming slang; Laura Pinnavaia on Richardson’s New Dictionary and the changing vocabulary of English; Peter Gilliver on early editorial decisions and reconsiderations in the making of the Oxford English Dictionary; Anne Dykstra on the use of Latin as the metalanguage in Joost Halbertsma’s Lexicon Frisicum; Laura Santone on the “Dictionnaire critique” serialized in Georges Bataille’s Surrealist review Documents; Sylvia Brown on the stories of missionary lexicography behind the Eskimo–English Dictionary of 1925; and Michael Adams on the legacies of the Early Modern English Dictionary project. The diverse critical perspectives of the leading lexicographers and historians of lexicography who contribute to this volume are united by a shared interest in the close reading of dictionaries, and a shared concern with the making and reading of dictionaries as human activities, which cannot be understood without attention to the lives of the people who undertook them.

Knickers in a Twist

Knickers in a Twist

Author: Jonathan Bernstein

Publisher: Grove Atlantic

ISBN: 9781555847944

Category: Reference

Page: 101

View: 478

Don’t play the silly bugger in front of your mates! Take a deep dive into British language and culture with this “hilarious and entertaining” reference (Chicago Tribune). Brits and Americans dress the same, eat at the same chain restaurants, and pass music back and forth across the Atlantic, and our national leaders are practically conjoined twins. But the second the Brits open their mouths, all bets are off. So don’t dream of visiting the United Kingdom, dating a Brit, or truly understanding what Jude Law is saying without this handy, hilarious, and informative guide to Britspeak. With the cheekiness of Austin Powers and the tidbit quotient of Schott’s Miscellany, screenwriter Jonathan Bernstein’s collection of Cockney rhyming slang, insults culled from British television shows of yore, and regional and “high British” favorites provides hours of educational, enlightening, even life-saving hilarity. And if it doesn’t accomplish that, at least you’ll be aware that when a British citizen describes you as a “wally,” a “herbert,” a “spanner,” or a “bampot,” he’s not showering you with compliments. Knickers in a Twist is as indispensable as a London city guide, as spot-on funny as an episode of The Office, and as edifying as Born to Kvetch and Eats, Shoots and Leaves. “Indispensable.” —Vanity Fair “Will probably do more for revolutionizing the way you and your nearest and dearest address one another than any other book out this year . . . Often bring[s] an overt chuckle.” —Edge New York

Lexicography and Terminology

Lexicography and Terminology

Author: Olga Karpova

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443809412

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 205

View: 625

The present book contains a collection of works devoted to current trends in theoretical and practical lexicography, terminology and terminography. All papers are divided into two main sections. Part I: Lexicography deals with analysis of historical and typological problems in lexicography with special reference to English, Italian, Russian and Southern African dictionaries for general- and special- purposes. The main focus is given to the description of principles in lexicographic presentation of non-equivalent lexics, rhyming slang, idioms, clichés and gender nominations of people in bilingual and monolingual dictionaries. Part II: Terminology and Terminography is devoted to description of the current tendencies observed in terminology and terminography studies with special reference to modern European languages such as English, Russian, Norwegian, etc. Terms of different special domains are viewed from the angle of the latest achievements of modern science, cognitive linguistics in particular. It reveals specific features of terminological word-combinations, terms in colloquial use, peculiarities of terms belonging to newly formed Languages for Special purposes, typical features of recently appeared LSPs and presentations of new dictionaries’ projects of different subject areas. This part reveals international nature of current tendencies in terminology studies and shows the national ways of their functioning and presentation in special dictionaries.

A Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

A Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

Author: Julian Franklyn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136109485

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 224

View: 246

This re-issue of Julian Franklyn's classic dictionary not only defines these expressions but also explains their origin and history. An introductory essay examines the roots and development of rhyming slang. Although many people assume that rhyming slang is exclusively Cockney, Franklyn illustrates how it is common to Australian and Americn dialects. From the unlikely to the bizarre, the 1,500 entries both entertain and enlighten. Cartoons enliven a reference section which combines linguistic detail and cultural analysis. Whether reading the dictionary from cover to cover, or dipping into it as a reference tool, linguists and students of popular culture will find it the definitive source of information on rhyming slang.

How to Speak Brit

How to Speak Brit

Author: Christopher J. Moore

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780698162136

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 128

View: 727

The quintessential A to Z guide to British English—perfect for every egghead and bluestocking looking to conquer the language barrier Oscar Wilde once said the Brits have "everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language." Any visitor to Old Blighty can sympathize with Mr. Wilde. After all, even fluent English speakers can be at sixes and sevens when told to pick up the "dog and bone" or "head to the loo," so they can "spend a penny." Wherever did these peculiar expressions come from? British author Christopher J. Moore made a name for himself on this side of the pond with the sleeper success of his previous book, In Other Words. Now, Moore draws on history, literature, pop culture, and his own heritage to explore the phrases that most embody the British character. He traces the linguistic influence of writers from Chaucer to Shakespeare and Dickens to Wodehouse, and unravels the complexity Brits manage to imbue in seemingly innocuous phrases like "All right." Along the way, Moore reveals the uniquely British origins of some of the English language’s more curious sayings. For example: Who is Bob and how did he become your uncle? Why do we refer to powerless politicians as “lame ducks”? How did “posh” become such a stylish word? Part language guide, part cultural study, How to Speak Brit is the perfect addition to every Anglophile’s library and an entertaining primer that will charm the linguistic-minded legions.

The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English

The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English

Author: Tom Dalzell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317372523

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 864

View: 917

Booklist Top of the List Reference Source The heir and successor to Eric Partridge's brilliant magnum opus, The Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, this two-volume New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English is the definitive record of post WWII slang. Containing over 60,000 entries, this new edition of the authoritative work on slang details the slang and unconventional English of the English-speaking world since 1945, and through the first decade of the new millennium, with the same thorough, intense, and lively scholarship that characterized Partridge's own work. Unique, exciting and, at times, hilariously shocking, key features include: unprecedented coverage of World English, with equal prominence given to American and British English slang, and entries included from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India, South Africa, Ireland, and the Caribbean emphasis on post-World War II slang and unconventional English published sources given for each entry, often including an early or significant example of the term’s use in print. hundreds of thousands of citations from popular literature, newspapers, magazines, movies, and songs illustrating usage of the headwords dating information for each headword in the tradition of Partridge, commentary on the term’s origins and meaning New to this edition: A new preface noting slang trends of the last five years Over 1,000 new entries from the US, UK and Australia New terms from the language of social networking Many entries now revised to include new dating, new citations from written sources and new glosses The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English is a spectacular resource infused with humour and learning – it’s rude, it’s delightful, and it’s a prize for anyone with a love of language.