The Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary

The Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary

Author: Geoff Tibballs

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473566873

Category: Humor

Page: 128

View: 676

The classic pocket guide to the language of London. This wonderful little guide to cockney rhyming slang contains over 1,700 old and new rhymes translated from Cockney to English and English to Cockney, including: Custard and jelly - telly Hot cross bun - nun Lemon tart - smart Rock ’n’ roll - dole Sticky toffee - coffee ...and many more. Master the art of the Cockney rhyme and discover the Cockney origins of common British phrases.

A Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

A Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

Author: Julian Franklyn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136109409

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 224

View: 217

This re-issue of Julian Franklyn's classic dictionary not only defines these expressions but also explains their origin and history. An introductory essay examines the roots and development of rhyming slang. Although many people assume that rhyming slang is exclusively Cockney, Franklyn illustrates how it is common to Australian and Americn dialects. From the unlikely to the bizarre, the 1,500 entries both entertain and enlighten. Cartoons enliven a reference section which combines linguistic detail and cultural analysis. Whether reading the dictionary from cover to cover, or dipping into it as a reference tool, linguists and students of popular culture will find it the definitive source of information on rhyming slang.

Intoxerated

Intoxerated

Author: Paul Dickson

Publisher: Melville House

ISBN: 9781612191447

Category: Reference

Page: 208

View: 540

A smart, hilarious, and lavishly illustrated guide to the most euphemised word in the English language: Drunk A record-breaking assemblage of 2,964 different ways to say "drunk." Tipsy, roasted, three sheets, whazooed and Boris Yeltsinned are just the beginning....With an introduction by the wise-guy lexicographer himself, Paul Dickson, and illustrations by renowned artist Brian Rea. Dickson, who holds the Guiness World Record for collecting the most words for being, er, not sober, not only provides a dictionary of those words, but reveals why there are so many synonyms for being "drunk," and how he came to collect more of them than anyone else. The terms are annotated, too, and lushly illustrated, explaining the twist and turns of a language that has thousands of ways to say the same thing. How, for example, does a word like "blotto" go from the lips of P.G. Wodehouse, into the writings of Edmund Wilson, before landing with Otto from The Simpson's ("My name is Otto, I like to get blotto").

The Oxford Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

The Oxford Dictionary of Rhyming Slang

Author: John Ayto

Publisher: Oxford Quick Reference

ISBN: 0198607512

Category: English language

Page: 309

View: 827

A lively, authoritative, and up-to-date look at the world of rhyming slang, from its origins in London's 19th-century underworld to the buzzwords of 21st-century popney. Arranged by topic, including Crime, Food and Drink, Illness, Money, Sex, and Sport, this highly readable collection is at once an informative source to the story behind some of our most lively expressions and a browser's delight.

London Rabbit

London Rabbit

Author: Ian Wilkes

Publisher: Ian Henry Publications

ISBN: 0860255387

Category: Reference

Page: 64

View: 594

Charming and funny pocket dictionary of London's Cockney Rhyming Slang.

A History of Cant and Slang Dictionaries

A History of Cant and Slang Dictionaries

Author: Julie Coleman

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191563584

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 520

View: 764

This book continues Julie Coleman's acclaimed history of dictionaries of English slang and cant. It describes the increasingly systematic and scholarly way in which such terms were recorded and classified in the UK, the USA, Australia, and elsewhere, and the huge growth in the publication of and public appetite for dictionaries, glossaries, and guides to the distinctive vocabularies of different social groups, classes, districts, regions, and nations. Dr Coleman describes the origins of words and phrases and explores their history. By copious example she shows how they cast light on everyday life across the globe - from settlers in Canada and Australia and cockneys in London to gang-members in New York and soldiers fighting in the Boer and First World Wars - as well as on the operations of the narcotics trade and the entertainment business and the lives of those attending American colleges and British public schools. The slang lexicographers were a colourful bunch. Those featured in this book include spiritualists, aristocrats, socialists, journalists, psychiatrists, school-boys, criminals, hoboes, police officers, and a serial bigamist. One provided the inspiration for Robert Lewis Stevenson's Long John Silver. Another was allegedly killed by a pork pie. Julie Coleman's account will interest historians of language, crime, poverty, sexuality, and the criminal underworld.

Knickers in a Twist

Knickers in a Twist

Author: Jonathan Bernstein

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN: 9780857869456

Category: Humor

Page: 194

View: 631

Brits and Americans dress the same, eat at the same chain restaurants and pass music back and forth across the Atlantic. But the second we Brits open our mouths, all bets are off. The aim of these unscholarly pages is to guide you through the jungle of British slang, uncovering the etymology but also illuminating the correct usage. And if it doesn't accomplish that, at least you'll be aware that when a British citizen describes you as a "wally," a "herbert," a "spanner," or a "bampot," he's not showering you with compliments. Knickers in a Twist is as indispensable as a London city guide, as spot-on funny as an episode of The Office, and as edifying as Eats, Shoots & Leaves. Screenwriter Jonathan Bernstein's collection of Cockney rhyming slang, insults culled from British television shows of yore, and regional and "high British" favourites provides hours of educational, enlightening, even lifesaving hilarity. PIG'S EAR Incompetent execution of a relatively simple task; also a delicious repast. BETTER THAN A POKE IN THE EYE WITH A SHARP STICK Another way of reminding an ungrateful recipient that the paltry amount he is receiving for, say, compiling a list of British slang is better than nothing at all. SICK AS A PARROT Horribly disappointed; most frequently employed by heartbroken UK football fans after their hopes of international glory are once again dashed. FANCY THE PANTS OFF To sexually desire someone so intensely that their clothes spontaneously disappear. Only the first four words of the previous sentence are technically accurate.

Dictionary of Slang Words

Dictionary of Slang Words

Author: Manik Joshi

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798512336540

Category:

Page: 78

View: 802

Slangs are very informal or specific words that are especially used by a particular group of people and more common in spoken English. In this book, you will study and learn various common slang words, cockney rhyming slangs and internet slangs Sample This: 01 -- aardvark [n.] -- (British Slang) hard work, unpleasant tasks; 02 -- abbess [n.] -- (British Slang) a woman who runs a brothel; 03 -- about done [adj.] -- (British Slang) completed or finished; 04 -- about right [adj.] -- (British Slang) Slightly drunk; 05 -- absotively (adv.) -- (American Slang) absolutely, positively; 06 -- AC/DC [adj.] -- bisexual; 07 -- acid [n.] -- LSD ((Lysergic acid diethylamide) an illegal drug that affects people's minds and causes them to see and hear things that are not really there; 08 -- action [n.] -- (American Slang) the state of feeling excited; 09 -- antifreeze [n.] -- (American Slang) liquor; 10 -- aries [n.] -- heroin, a drug that has strong side effects; 11 -- ashes [n.] -- cannabis or marijuana; 12 -- aunt Mary [n.] -- cannabis or marijuana; 13 -- axe [n.] -- musical instrument, especially a guitar or saxophone; 14 -- axeman [n.] -- a man who plays a musical instrument, especially a guitar or saxophone; 15 -- axle grease [n.] -- (British Slang) a bribe (American Slang) butter SLANGS - IDIOMS -- 01 -- a bit of all right (British Slang) -- a person that you think is very attractive in a physical way; 02 -- a bit of rough (British Slang) -- a man from a low social class who has a physical relationship with a woman of a higher social class; 03 -- a cold day in hell -- the time of occurrence of an event that will never happen; 04 -- a grape on the business (Australian Slang) -- a person whose presence spoils things for others COCKNEY RHYMING SLANG -- Rhyming slang works by taking a usual or common word and using a rhyming phrase of two or three words to replace it. The second or the last word in the rhyming phrase rhymes with the usual or common word. For instance, we can use the rhyming phrase 'apples and pears' in place of a common word 'stairs' -- Apples and Pears - Stairs -- You can say "Apples and pears are a key part of the home." [instead of "Stairs are a key part of the home."] Note: Sometimes, the last word is dropped in common speech. So, you can also say, "Apples are a key part of the home." (We dropped "and pears" from the above sentence.) Cockney Rhyming slang Cockney is a dialect of the English language. Cockney Rhyming slang is believed to have originated in the mid-19th century in the East End of London. Traditionally, a cockney is someone who lives in the East End of London. INTERNET SLANGS [Most Internet slangs are a short form of phrases but often they cannot be pronounced, ] 121 -- One to One; 2day -- Today; 2moro -- Tomorrow; 2nite -- Tonight; 4EAE -- For Ever and Ever

Vocabulary

Vocabulary

Author: Laurie Bauer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134712854

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 104

View: 992

Routledge Language Workbooks are practical introductions to specific areas of language for absolute beginners. They provide comprehensive coverage of the area as well as a basis for further study. Language Workbooks can be used for independent study or as part of a taught class. Vocabulary: * covers issues such as the power of words to influence our perceptions * looks at the origins of words from English and other languages * explores the relationships between the meanings and shapes of words * examines the correlation of different kinds of words with different style levels * uses striking and entertaining examples to make fundamental points about the words we use * lays the groundwork for further study in morphology, lexical semantics, historical linguistics and lexicography.

The Ridiculously Comprehensive Dictionary of British Slang

The Ridiculously Comprehensive Dictionary of British Slang

Author: Ian Hall

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1532949553

Category:

Page: 216

View: 240

Slang has been in use for as long as men have used a spoken language. In using slang, Britain is no different, but perhaps the isolation of our Island Fortress has allowed us to accumulate more than its fair share. So... ...whether you are researching a novel ...or perhaps just want to understand British television better ...or maybe you're just a trivia junkie The source of your motivation doesn't matter... this book is for you! English slang, Scottish slang, Regional slang, Cockney Rhyming slang. We've got it all covered. And no useless filler either! With almost 200 pages of definitions we get straight to the point... slang. So don't be a plonker, stop fannying around, and get yourself a copy.