Reduction of CO2 Emissions from Road Transport in Cities

Reduction of CO2 Emissions from Road Transport in Cities

Author: Michal Markiewicz

Publisher: Springer Vieweg

ISBN: 3658163186

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 169

View: 597

Michal Markiewicz presents the outcomes of his research regarding the influence of dynamic route guidance system on overall emission of carbon dioxide from road transport in rural areas. Sustainable transportation in smart cities is a big challenge of our time, but before electric vehicles replace vehicles that burn fossil fuels we have to think about traffic optimization methods that reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions.

Strategies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Road Transport

Strategies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Road Transport

Author: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Publisher: Organization for Economic

ISBN: UCSD:31822031638364

Category: Transportation

Page: 80

View: 751

Approximately 27% of OECD CO2 emissions come from transport. This is the report of a working group set up to provide a framework to assess strategies for the reduction of emissions from road transport. It looks at current policies to reduce emissions and the current methods for assessing their impact. After examining future trends, it looks at the role of evaluation models in the development of strategies to reduce the emission of CO2.

Cars and Carbon

Cars and Carbon

Author: Theodoros I. Zachariadis

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400721234

Category: Science

Page: 422

View: 639

This volume contains articles from leading analysts and researchers on sustainable transportation, who provide critical reflections on how automobile-related climate policies have evolved up to now in Europe and around the world, in view of the widely recognized need to substantially curb global emissions of greenhouse gases in the coming decades. Authors describe the policies which have been most effective, outline their economic and social implications, present success stories while critically reviewing less successful examples, and suggest strategies to decarbonize passenger transportation on a global scale.

Reducing Carbon Emissions from Transport

Reducing Carbon Emissions from Transport

Author: Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Environmental Audit Committee

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN: 9780215030429

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 391

View: 789

The Committee's report examines the challenges involved in efforts to reduce carbon emissions from the UK transport sector and makes recommendations to improve future progress, as part of its overall priority for the current Parliament of focusing on climate change issues. Topics discussed include: the Government's strategic priorities; measures to reduce carbon emissions from road transport, trains, water freight and aviation; emissions from developing economies; the future price and availability of oil. This volume contains a range of oral and written evidence taken by the Committee in the course of its inquiry, including contributions from officials from the Department for Transport, Transport for London, the Environment Agency, Transport 2000 and Sustrans, as well as from environmental groups and from representatives from the motoring, aviation, rail, freight transport and shipping industries.

Low-carbon Land Transport

Low-carbon Land Transport

Author: Daniel Bongardt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781849713771

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 266

View: 589

This book provides a guide for transport policymakers and planners on achieving low-carbon land transport systems and describes possible measures for reducing emissions. Based on wide ranging research, case studies from developed and developing countries and an overview of policy scenarios, it book presents a toolbox for decision-makers with a huge variety of measures which can be tailored to their specific circumstances. It also addresses the question of how policies can be bundled successfully and integrated in urban transport decision-making and planning. Practical information is given on how greenhouse gas savings are measured as well as success factors for implementing policies and measures in complex decision-making processes.

Decarbonisation in Transport and Warehousing

Decarbonisation in Transport and Warehousing

Author: Christian Krogmann

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783656210290

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 13

View: 883

Seminar paper from the year 2012 in the subject Business economics - Supply, Production, Logistics, grade: A, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, course: Green Logistics, language: English, abstract: The debate of climate change is occupying many parties not only in environmental terms and it has gained importance in the last decade. Although the existence of climate change and particularly a corresponding human responsibility has advocates and opponents, it is obvious that climate change will be a serious issue for everyone if it impacts our nature as predicted (IPCC, 2007a). Hence, institutions such as the IPPC, UNEP, WMO or UNFCCC were introduced in order to guide governments and principally everyone in order to assess and to mitigate climate change. The UNFCCC’s ultimate aim, for instance, is to stabilize the concentration of greenhouse gases ‘at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system’ (United Nations, 1992: 9). However, this ultimate aim relies on many-sided sub-ordinate targets. One of these targets is to reduce carbon emissions in the logistics sector (McKinnon et al., 2010). In the following chapter 2, opportunities for technological and behavioural changes in order to cut carbon emissions are presented for the logistical activities freight transport (main focus is on road transport) and warehousing. In chapter 3, an evaluation of the question which set of changes is likely to have greater influence is given together with a final conclusion.

Personal Transport and the Greenhouse Effect

Personal Transport and the Greenhouse Effect

Author: Peter Hughes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134052387

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 190

View: 251

The issue of 'sustainability' in the developed world is nowhere more critical than in the field of personal travel, which in many countries has become the fastest-growing contributor to global warming. Unless the use of cars can be brought under control, there is little chance of meeting government targets for reducing greenhouse emissions. Personal Transport and the Greenhouse Effect sets out the steps that could be taken to lessen the conflict between personal mobility and long-term environmental security. It provides a detailed analysis of the policy options available for limiting carbon dioxide emissions, and highlights the limitations of technological measures in solving the problem. Instead, the book's 12-point plan for sustainability shows how a significant reduction in emissions requires the use of all the policy measures available. This valuable contribution to a crucial area of debate covering energy, transport policy and the environment will be essential reading for policy makers, planners and students alike. Peter Huges is deputy editor of Local Transport Today, and has contributed to a wide range of publications including The Daily Telegraph, The Guardian, New Scientist and Energy Policy. Originally published in 1993

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Author: U. S Department of Energy

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 1482613530

Category: Science

Page: 108

View: 238

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions. In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity. In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world's roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption. If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world's roads. In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world's roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. This National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) publication, “Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles to Reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions: A Resource Guide for Project Development” provides national and international project developers with a guide on how to estimate and document the GHG emission reduction benefits and/or penalties of battery-powered and hybrid-electric vehicle projects. This primer also provides a resource for the creation of GHG emission reduction projects for the Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) Pilot Phase and in anticipation of other market-based project mechanisms proposed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Though it will be necessary for project developers and other entities to evaluate the emission benefits of each project on a case-by-case basis, this primer will provide a guide for determining which data and information to include during the process of developing the project proposal.

Increasing Security and Reducing Carbon Emissions of the U. S. Transportation Sector

Increasing Security and Reducing Carbon Emissions of the U. S. Transportation Sector

Author: David Gray

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781437911107

Category:

Page: 69

View: 417

The USAF has a goal to supply 50%t of its fuel requirements from domestic synthetic sources by 2016. This study had 2 objectives. The first was to develop a coal-biomass-to-liquids (CBTL) plant design that is potentially capable of co-gasifying mixtures of coal and biomass to produce a clean synthesis gas that can then be sent to Fischer-Tropsch units for synthesis of clean diesel, jet and naphtha liquid fuels. The second objective was to develop a CBTL pathway for diesel fuel production that has the potential of providing 100,000 BPD of synthetic fuel with the requirement that carbon dioxide emissions should be less than those from conventional petroleum. Three biomass types were selected for study: woody biomass, switchgrass, and corn stover. Illus.

Intercity Transport and Climate Change

Intercity Transport and Climate Change

Author: Yoshitsugu Hayashi

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331935258X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 652

While intercity passenger transport counts for about 2% of the total passenger transport volume the share of the total passenger kilometers traveled is estimated more than one third. In many countries the major part of intercity transport is performed by car and air and as a result, the contribution to the carbon footprint is substantially higher than the share of overall passenger transport performance. This creates a challenge to develop a sustainable organization of intercity transport which requires a true joint effort of policy makers, industry sectors and households. This presupposes that all options for reducing the carbon footprint of the transport modes – car, air and rail – are fully exploited through modern propulsion technology, use of regenerative energy and efficient organization of transport processes. Basic conditions for meeting this requirement are an incentive compatible public framework of regulation, taxation, charging and education, the private willingness to adjust to new behavioral patterns and a consequent push of technological progress towards energy and CO2 savings. This book begins with an international comparison of intercity transport and the current state of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) of this transport segment. A focus is given to comparing the situation in the EU, the US and Japan while describing the more recent development of intercity transport in China, followed by an analysis of intercity transport policies and their contribution to meet the global climate change issues. This book will be of interest to researchers in transportation economics and policy, as well as civil engineering and planning.

Cutting Transport CO2 Emissions

Cutting Transport CO2 Emissions

Author: European Conference of Ministers of Transport

Publisher: European Conference of Ministers of

ISBN: UOM:39015069183302

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 274

View: 230

This report reviews the progress OECD and ECMT countries have made in reducing transport sector CO2 emissions and makes recommendations for the focus of future policies. It analyses over 400 abatement measures introduced or under development. Despite significant efforts on the part of some countries, transport CO2 emissions have increased steadily over the last ten years. Slowing the growth of these emissions will require more government action and an increasingly pro-active role from transport sector industries. The report identifies the policies most likely to be effective and underlines the importance of energy efficiency improvements for cost effective action on global warming.

A green logistics strategy for a logistics service provider

A green logistics strategy for a logistics service provider

Author: Ralph Strubbe

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783668303638

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 81

View: 119

Master's Thesis from the year 2013 in the subject Business economics - Supply, Production, Logistics, grade: 1,4, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh (School of Management and Languages), course: Green Logistics, language: English, abstract: With climate change and global warming being indisputable the world, its people, economy and companies face severe consequences. These can be literally natural disasters, ambitious climate protection goals and tightened environmental legislation for companies. As freight transport is responsible for a significant proportion of man made CO2 emissions it needs to contribute heavily to accomplishing Kyoto Protocol CO2 reduction targets. Besides complying with legislation focusing on sustainable development of logistics can yield further advantages such as cost savings and enhanced reputation. This dissertation is about developing a green logistics strategy for Strubbe as a logistics service provider mainly concerned with freight transport. In terms of freight transport considering green strategies means focusing on managing carbon emissions. As managing without measuring is not possible the first step was calculating Strubbe ́s carbon footprint. The energy-based calculation approach revealed TTW emissions of 1,120.39 tonnes CO2e for 2012, equivalent to 0.057 kg CO2e per tkm. Even though this intensity figure is lower than default values it could still be reduced by applying carbon emission reduction measures. These measures needed to be applicable to a freight transport concerned small logistics service provider like Strubbe. The review of potential measures yielded five practically applicable options: use of biodiesel (36.27%), reduction of maximum speed to 80 km/h (2.33%), vertical collaboration (1.88%), aerodynamic profiling (1.7%) and reduction of engine idling (0.41%). Their resprective percentage carbon abatement potentials are displayed in brackets. Further analysis revealed following changes in operating cost, in other words abatement costs: use of biodiesel (+19.24%), reduction of maximum speed to 80 km/h (+3.33%), vertical collaboration (-1.88%), aerodynamic profiling (+0.05%), reduction of engine idling (-0.41%). Due to the highly competitive freight transport market it is recommended that the affected companies strive for weak sustainable development of their operations. Any increase of operating cost should be avoided. Thus only carbon reduction measures which decrease operating cost should be applied. Strubbe should implement all of the reviewed measures except the use of biodiesel.