NASA Mercury - 1956 to 1963 (all models)

NASA Mercury - 1956 to 1963 (all models)

Author: David Baker

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN: 1785210645

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 882

Full coverage of the design, engineering, development and flight operations of NASA's Mercury spacecraft, which in addition to several unmanned tests supported two piloted ballistic sub-orbital flights in 1961 and four piloted orbital flights between 1962 and 1963.The Mercury programme bridged the gap between the hypersonic X-15 and the two-man Gemini spacecraft, which in turn led to the Apollo spacecraft. MERCURY - AMERICA'S FIRST PILOTED SPACECRAFT 1958-1963 completes the Haynes Workshop manual series of US and Russian piloted space vehicles and serves as a precursor to a possible Hynes Workshop Manual on the NASA Orion deep-space exploration vehicle scheduled to fly in 2018 on the Space Launch System, the world's biggest rocket.The emphasis in the book will on describing the design, engineering and technology of the Mercury spacecraft rather than on the missions, which are comprehensively covered in several previously published books. In this way the Workshop Manual brand line is maintained as a reference to the way machines are built and operated.

Mercury Rising: John Glenn, John Kennedy, and the New Battleground of the Cold War

Mercury Rising: John Glenn, John Kennedy, and the New Battleground of the Cold War

Author: Jeff Shesol

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9781324003250

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 558

A riveting history of the epic orbital flight that put America back into the space race. If the United States couldn’t catch up to the Soviets in space, how could it compete with them on Earth? That was the question facing John F. Kennedy at the height of the Cold War—a perilous time when the Soviet Union built the wall in Berlin, tested nuclear bombs more destructive than any in history, and beat the United States to every major milestone in space. The race to the heavens seemed a race for survival—and America was losing. On February 20, 1962, when John Glenn blasted into orbit aboard Friendship 7, his mission was not only to circle the planet; it was to calm the fears of the free world and renew America’s sense of self-belief. Mercury Rising re-creates the tension and excitement of a flight that shifted the momentum of the space race and put the United States on the path to the moon. Drawing on new archival sources, personal interviews, and previously unpublished notes by Glenn himself, Mercury Rising reveals how the astronaut’s heroics lifted the nation’s hopes in what Kennedy called the "hour of maximum danger."