Luso-Brazilian Encounters of the Sixteenth Century

Luso-Brazilian Encounters of the Sixteenth Century

Author: Alessandro Zir

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson

ISBN: 9781611470215

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 682

As it happens with other early-Modern corpora, the descriptive texts from 16th-century encounters of the Portuguese colonizers in Brazil are well-known for their strangeness. In them we find references to entities like monsters and demons, bizarre descriptions, and odd classification systems of plants and animals. For the most part, these elements are dismissed as mere eccentricities by modern scholars studying these texts. Instead, this book takes these elements seriously. They are focused on and tackled with a theoretical tool—styles of thinking—not yet used in Luso-Brazilian studies, and coming from another field of inquiry: philosophy and history of science. By doing so the book aims to unveil epistemological and ontological issues in which colonial and post-colonial studies are entangled, and which have a relevance that goes beyond debates concerning, for instance, the formation of Brazil's cultural identity.

Luso-Brazilian Encounters of the Sixteenth Century

Luso-Brazilian Encounters of the Sixteenth Century

Author: Alessandro Zir

Publisher:

ISBN: 161147020X

Category: History

Page: 121

View: 147

The 16th-century corpus of the Portuguese colonizers of Brazil is well-known for the presence of strange elements, such as references to monsters and demons, bizarre descriptions, and odd systems of classifications of plants and animals. Instead of dismissing such elements as mere early-modern eccentricities, Luso-Brazilian Encounters of the Sixteenth Century aims to unveil epistemological and mainly ontological issues that might give intelligibility to them, and connect the work of the Portuguese with pre-modern and also post-modern styles of thinking in literary and mystical traditions.

Courtly Encounters

Courtly Encounters

Author: Sanjay Subrahmanyam

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674067363

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 329

In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the court was the crucial site where expanding Eurasian states and empires met and made sense of one another. Richly illustrated, Courtly Encounters provides a fresh cross-cultural perspective on early modern Islam, Counter-Reformation Catholicism, Protestantism, and a newly emergent Hindu sphere.

Crossings and Encounters

Crossings and Encounters

Author: Laura R. Prieto

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 9781643360850

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 942

For centuries the Atlantic world has been a site of encounter and exchange, a rich point of transit where one could remake one's identity or find it transformed. Through this interdisciplinary collection of essays, Laura R. Prieto and Stephen R. Berry offer vivid new accounts of how individuals remapped race, gender, and sexuality through their lived experience and in the cultural imagination. Crossings and Encounters is the first single volume to address these three intersecting categories across the Atlantic world and beyond the colonial period. The Atlantic world offered novel possibilities to and exposed vulnerabilities of many kinds of people, from travelers to urban dwellers, native Americans to refugees. European colonial officials tried to regulate relationships and impose rigid ideologies of gender, while perceived distinctions of culture, religion, and ethnicity gradually calcified into modern concepts of race. Amid the instabilities of colonial settlement and slave societies, people formed cross-racial sexual relationships, marriages, families, and households. These not only afforded some women and men with opportunities to achieve stability; they also furnished ways to redefine one's status. Crossings and Encounters spans broadly from early contact zones in the seventeenth-century Americas to the postcolonial present, and it covers the full range of the Atlantic world, including the Caribbean, North America, and Latin America. The essays examine the historical intersections between race and gender to illuminate the fluid identities and the dynamic communities of the Atlantic world.

Go-betweens and the Colonization of Brazil

Go-betweens and the Colonization of Brazil

Author: Alida C. Metcalf

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292748606

Category: Social Science

Page: 391

View: 459

Doña Marina (La Malinche) ...Pocahontas ...Sacagawea—their names live on in historical memory because these women bridged the indigenous American and European worlds, opening the way for the cultural encounters, collisions, and fusions that shaped the social and even physical landscape of the modern Americas. But these famous individuals were only a few of the many thousands of people who, intentionally or otherwise, served as "go-betweens" as Europeans explored and colonized the New World. In this innovative history, Alida Metcalf thoroughly investigates the many roles played by go-betweens in the colonization of sixteenth-century Brazil. She finds that many individuals created physical links among Europe, Africa, and Brazil—explorers, traders, settlers, and slaves circulated goods, plants, animals, and diseases. Intercultural liaisons produced mixed-race children. At the cultural level, Jesuit priests and African slaves infused native Brazilian traditions with their own religious practices, while translators became influential go-betweens, negotiating the terms of trade, interaction, and exchange. Most powerful of all, as Metcalf shows, were those go-betweens who interpreted or represented new lands and peoples through writings, maps, religion, and the oral tradition. Metcalf's convincing demonstration that colonization is always mediated by third parties has relevance far beyond the Brazilian case, even as it opens a revealing new window on the first century of Brazilian history.

Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640

Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean, 1570-1640

Author: David Wheat

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781469623801

Category: History

Page: 353

View: 679

This work resituates the Spanish Caribbean as an extension of the Luso-African Atlantic world from the late sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century, when the union of the Spanish and Portuguese crowns facilitated a surge in the transatlantic slave trade. After the catastrophic decline of Amerindian populations on the islands, two major African provenance zones, first Upper Guinea and then Angola, contributed forced migrant populations with distinct experiences to the Caribbean. They played a dynamic role in the social formation of early Spanish colonial society in the fortified port cities of Cartagena de Indias, Havana, Santo Domingo, and Panama City and their semirural hinterlands. David Wheat is the first scholar to establish this early phase of the "Africanization" of the Spanish Caribbean two centuries before the rise of large-scale sugar plantations. With African migrants and their descendants comprising demographic majorities in core areas of Spanish settlement, Luso-Africans, Afro-Iberians, Latinized Africans, and free people of color acted more as colonists or settlers than as plantation slaves. These ethnically mixed and economically diversified societies constituted a region of overlapping Iberian and African worlds, while they made possible Spain's colonization of the Caribbean.

The Baker Who Pretended to Be King of Portugal

The Baker Who Pretended to Be King of Portugal

Author: Ruth MacKay

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226501109

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 285

On August 4, 1578, in an ill-conceived attempt to wrest Morocco back from the hands of the infidel Moors, King Sebastian of Portugal led his troops to slaughter and was himself slain. Sixteen years later, King Sebastian rose again. In one of the most famous of European impostures, Gabriel de Espinosa, an ex-soldier and baker by trade—and most likely under the guidance of a distinguished Portuguese friar—appeared in a Spanish convent town passing himself off as the lost monarch. The principals, along with a large cast of nuns, monks, and servants, were confined and questioned for nearly a year as a crew of judges tried to unravel the story, but the culprits went to their deaths with many questions left unanswered. Ruth MacKay recalls this conspiracy, marked both by scheming and absurdity, and the legal inquest that followed, to show how stories of this kind are conceived, told, circulated, and believed. She reveals how the story of Sebastian, supposedly in hiding and planning to return to claim his crown, was lodged among other familiar stories: prophecies of returned leaders, nuns kept against their will, kidnappings by Moors, miraculous escapes, and monarchs who die for their country. As MacKay demonstrates, the conspiracy could not have succeeded without the circulation of news, the retellings of the fatal battle in well-read chronicles, and the networks of rumors and correspondents, all sharing the hope or belief that Sebastian had survived and would one day return. With its royal intrigues, ambitious artisans, dissatisfied religious women, and corrupt clergy, The Baker Who Pretended to Be King of Portugal will undoubtedly captivate readers as it sheds new light on the intricate political and cultural relations between Spain and Portugal in the early modern period and the often elusive nature of historical truth.

Visions, Prophecies and Divinations

Visions, Prophecies and Divinations

Author: Ana Paula Torres

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004316454

Category: Religion

Page: 266

View: 561

One of the first English-language collections of essays dedicated to the millenarianism in the early modern Iberian world, Visions, Prophecies and Divinations offers an introduction to the complex phenomena of prophecy and vision in Spanish and Portuguese Empires.

'ReCapricorning' the Atlantic

'ReCapricorning' the Atlantic

Author: Peter M. Beattie

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299237837

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 709

This special issue of Luso-Brazilian Review includes articles on the Lusophone South Atlantic by historians of Africa and Brazil originally presented in May of 2006 at the Michigan State University and University of Michigan’s Atlantic History Workshop “ReCapricorning the Atlantic: Luso-Brazilian and Luso-African Perspectives on the Atlantic World.” Workshop participants set out to “ReCapricorn the Atlantic” by assessing how new research on the Lusophone South Atlantic modifies, challenges, or confirms major trends and paradigms in the expanding scholarship on Atlantic History.

Cannibalizing the Colony

Cannibalizing the Colony

Author: Richard Allen Gordon

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 9781557535191

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 689

The years 1992 and 2000 marked the 500-year anniversary of the arrival of the Spanish and the Portuguese in America and prompted an explosion of rewritings and cinematic renditions of texts and figures from colonial Latin America. Cannibalizing the Colony analyzes a crucial way that Latin American historical films have grappled with the legacy of colonialism. It studies how and why filmmakers in Brazil and Mexico—the countries that have produced most films about the colonial period in Latin America—appropriate and transform colonial narratives of European and indigenous contact into commentaries on national identity. The book looks at how filmmakers attempt to reconfigure history and culture and incorporate it into present-day understandings of the nation. The book additionally considers the motivations and implications for these filmic dialogues with the past and how the directors attempt to control the way that spectators understand the complex and contentious roots of identity in Mexico and Brazil.

Encyclopedia of Latin American Literature

Encyclopedia of Latin American Literature

Author: Verity Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135314255

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1781

View: 919

A comprehensive, encyclopedic guide to the authors, works, and topics crucial to the literature of Central and South America and the Caribbean, the Encyclopedia of Latin American Literature includes over 400 entries written by experts in the field of Latin American studies. Most entries are of 1500 words but the encyclopedia also includes survey articles of up to 10,000 words on the literature of individual countries, of the colonial period, and of ethnic minorities, including the Hispanic communities in the United States. Besides presenting and illuminating the traditional canon, the encyclopedia also stresses the contribution made by women authors and by contemporary writers. Outstanding Reference Source Outstanding Reference Book

Antonio Vieira and the Luso-Brazilian Baroque

Antonio Vieira and the Luso-Brazilian Baroque

Author: Thomas Cohen

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299237936

Category: History

Page: 146

View: 999

Preacher, politician, natural law theorist, administrator, diplomat, polemicist, prophetic thinker: Vieira was all of these things, but nothing was more central to his self-definition than his role as missionary and pastor. Articles in this issue were originally presented at a conference, “The Baroque World of Padre António Vieira: Religion, Culture and History in the Luso-Brazilian World,” Yale University, November 7–8, 1997, commemorating the three hundredth anniversary of Vieira’s death.