Economic Interdependence and War

Economic Interdependence and War

Author: Dale C. Copeland

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691161594

Category: Political Science

Page: 504

View: 998

Does growing economic interdependence among great powers increase or decrease the chance of conflict and war? Liberals argue that the benefits of trade give states an incentive to stay peaceful. Realists contend that trade compels states to struggle for vital raw materials and markets. Moving beyond the stale liberal-realist debate, Economic Interdependence and War lays out a dynamic theory of expectations that shows under what specific conditions interstate commerce will reduce or heighten the risk of conflict between nations. Taking a broad look at cases spanning two centuries, from the Napoleonic and Crimean wars to the more recent Cold War crises, Dale Copeland demonstrates that when leaders have positive expectations of the future trade environment, they want to remain at peace in order to secure the economic benefits that enhance long-term power. When, however, these expectations turn negative, leaders are likely to fear a loss of access to raw materials and markets, giving them more incentive to initiate crises to protect their commercial interests. The theory of trade expectations holds important implications for the understanding of Sino-American relations since 1985 and for the direction these relations will likely take over the next two decades. Economic Interdependence and War offers sweeping new insights into historical and contemporary global politics and the actual nature of democratic versus economic peace.

Power Ties

Power Ties

Author: Paul A. Papayoanou

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 047210960X

Category: Political Science

Page: 193

View: 711

Discusses the impact of economic integration on the likelihood of war or peace

Economic Interdependence and Conflict in World Politics

Economic Interdependence and Conflict in World Politics

Author: Mark J. C. Crescenzi

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105114136828

Category: Political Science

Page: 173

View: 374

This book explores one of the most important current topics in international relations: whether trade diminishes or enhances conflict. Mark J. C. Crescenzi adopts an original perspective, arguing that the 'exit costs' confronting states - how hard it would be for them to replace the trade they are threatening to cut - determines the credibility of the threat and the effect of such trade on the likelihood of political conflict.

Economic Interdependence and International Conflict

Economic Interdependence and International Conflict

Author: Edward Deering Mansfield

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472022939

Category: Political Science

Page: 286

View: 362

The claim that open trade promotes peace has sparked heated debate among scholars and policymakers for centuries. Until recently, however, this claim remained untested and largely unexplored. Economic Interdependence and International Conflict clarifies the state of current knowledge about the effects of foreign commerce on political-military relations and identifies the avenues of new research needed to improve our understanding of this relationship. The contributions to this volume offer crucial insights into the political economy of national security, the causes of war, and the politics of global economic relations. Edward D. Mansfield is Hum Rosen Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics at the University of Pennsylvania. Brian M. Pollins is Associate Professor of Political Science at Ohio State University and a Research Fellow at the Mershon Center.

Economics of War and Peace

Economics of War and Peace

Author: Ben Goldsmith

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 9780857240040

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 625

Presents the research on economic factors affecting peace and war. This title includes theoretical perspectives on the economic foundations of peace, violence and war within countries, connections between international trade and inter-state conflict, and the role of legal/institutional factors in international and internal conflict.

The Origins of the First World War

The Origins of the First World War

Author: William Mulligan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316982792

Category: History

Page:

View: 790

A second edition of this leading introduction to the origins of the First World War and the pre-war international system. William Mulligan shows how the war was a far from inevitable outcome of international politics in the early twentieth century and suggests instead that there were powerful forces operating in favour of the maintenance of peace. He discusses key issues ranging from the military, public opinion, economics, diplomacy and geopolitics to relations between the great powers, the role of smaller states and the disintegrating empires. In this new edition, the author assesses the extensive new literature on the war's origins and the July Crisis as well as introducing new themes such as the relationship between economic interdependence and military planning. With well-structured chapters and an extensive bibliography, this is an essential classroom text which significantly revises our understanding of diplomacy, political culture, and economic history from 1870 to 1914.

Economic Interdependence and Conflict in World Politics

Economic Interdependence and Conflict in World Politics

Author: Mark J. C. Crescenzi

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 073911039X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 173

View: 610

This book explores one of the most important current topics in international relations: whether trade diminishes or enhances conflict. Mark J. C. Crescenzi adopts an original perspective, arguing that the 'exit costs' confronting states - how hard it would be for them to replace the trade they are threatening to cut - determines the credibility of the threat and the effect of such trade on the likelihood of political conflict.

The WTO, Economic Interdependence, and Conflict

The WTO, Economic Interdependence, and Conflict

Author: Marc Lawrence Busch

Publisher: Edward Elgar Pub

ISBN: UCSD:31822034672519

Category: Political Science

Page: 647

View: 321

Evaluates the theoretical arguments about the relationship between foreign economic relations and political-military hostilities. This volume addresses the origins of various international institutions designed to influence global commerce, how these institutions operate, and the extent to which they shape the flow and content of overseas trade.

Institutional Balancing in the Asia Pacific

Institutional Balancing in the Asia Pacific

Author: Kai He

Publisher: Taylor & Francis US

ISBN: 9780415469524

Category: Political Science

Page: 209

View: 261

This book examines the strategic interactions among China, the United States, Japan, and Southeast Asian States in the context of China’s rise and globalization after the cold war. Engaging the mainstream theoretical debates in international relations, the author introduces a new theoretical framework—institutional realism—to explain the institutionalization of world politics in the Asia-Pacific after the cold war. Institutional realism suggests that deepening economic interdependence creates a condition under which states are more likely to conduct a new balancing strategy—institutional balancing, i.e., countering pressures or threats through initiating, utilizing, and dominating multilateral institutions—to pursue security under anarchy. To test the validity of institutional realism, Kai He examines the foreign policies of the U.S., Japan, the ASEAN states, and China toward four major multilateral institutions, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Regional Forum (ARF), ASEAN Plus Three (APT), and East Asian Summit (EAS). Challenging the popular pessimistic view regarding China’s rise, the book concludes that economic interdependence and structural constraints may well soften the "dragon’s teeth." China’s rise does not mean a dark future for the region. Institutional Balancing in the Asia Pacificwill be of great interest to policy makers and scholars of Asian security, international relations, Chinese foreign policy, and U.S. foreign policy.