Decolonizing Anthropology

Decolonizing Anthropology

Author: Faye Venetia Harrison

Publisher: American Anthropological Association

ISBN: UOM:39015040576640

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 352

Decolonizing Anthropology is part of a broader effort that aims to advance the critical reconstruction of the discipline devoted to understanding humankind in all its diversity and commonality. The utility and power of a decolonized anthropology must continue to be tested and developed. May the results of ethnographic probes--the data, the social and cultural analysis, the theorizing, and the strategies for knowledge application--help scholars envision clearer paths toincreased understanding, a heightened sense of intercultural and international solidarity, and last, but certainly not least, world transformation.

Decolonizing the Academy

Decolonizing the Academy

Author: Carole Boyce Davies

Publisher: Africa World Press

ISBN: 159221066X

Category: Social Science

Page: 358

View: 890

Decolonizing the Academy asserts that the academy,is perhaps the most colonized space. At the same,time the academy is a place of knowledge and,transformation. As we move into the 21st century,it is becoming clear that the academy is one of,the primary sites for the production and,reproduction of ideas that serve the interests of,colonising powers. This collection of essays,argues the possibility of re-engaging the,decolonizing process at the level of knowledge and,asserts that this is an ongoing project worthy of,being undertaken in a variety of fields.

Decolonizing Ethnography

Decolonizing Ethnography

Author: Carolina Alonso Bejarano

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9781478004547

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 384

In August 2011, ethnographers Carolina Alonso Bejarano and Daniel M. Goldstein began a research project on undocumented immigration in the United States by volunteering at a center for migrant workers in New Jersey. Two years later, Lucia López Juárez and Mirian A. Mijangos García—two local immigrant workers from Latin America—joined Alonso Bejarano and Goldstein as research assistants and quickly became equal partners for whom ethnographic practice was inseparable from activism. In Decolonizing Ethnography the four coauthors offer a methodological and theoretical reassessment of social science research, showing how it can function as a vehicle for activism and as a tool for marginalized people to theorize their lives. Tacking between personal narratives, ethnographic field notes, an original bilingual play about workers' rights, and examinations of anthropology as a discipline, the coauthors show how the participation of Mijangos García and López Juárez transformed the project's activist and academic dimensions. In so doing, they offer a guide for those wishing to expand the potential of ethnography to serve as a means for social transformation and decolonization.

Practices, Challenges, and Prospects of Digital Ethnography as a Multidisciplinary Method

Practices, Challenges, and Prospects of Digital Ethnography as a Multidisciplinary Method

Author: Chowdhury, Jahid Siraz

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN: 9781668441916

Category: Social Science

Page: 370

View: 633

Ethnography in the digital age presents new methods for research. It encourages scientists to think about how we live and study in a digital, material, and sensory world. Digital ethnography considers the impact of digital media on the methods and processes by which we perform ethnography and how the digital, methodological, practical, and theoretical aspects of ethnographic research are becoming increasingly interwoven. This planet does not exist in a static state; as technology grows and shifts, we must learn how to appropriately analyze these changes. Practices, Challenges, and Prospects of Digital Ethnography as a Multidisciplinary Method examines the pervasiveness of digital media in digital ethnography’s setting and practice. It investigates how digital settings, techniques, and procedures are reshaping ethnographic practice and explores the ethnographic-theoretical interactions through which “old” opinions are influenced by digital ethnography practice, going beyond merely transferring conventional concepts and techniques into digital research settings. Covering topics such as data triangulation, indigenous living systems, and digital technology, this premier reference source is an essential resource for libraries, students, teachers, sociologists, anthropologists, social workers, historians, political scientists, geographers, public health officials, archivists, government officials, researchers, and academicians.

Design Anthropology

Design Anthropology

Author: Wendy Gunn

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780857853691

Category: Social Science

Page: 331

View: 456

Design Anthropology provides the definitive introduction to the field of design anthropology and the concepts, methods, practices and challenges of this exciting and emerging area of study

Indigenous Studies and Engaged Anthropology

Indigenous Studies and Engaged Anthropology

Author: Professor Paul Sillitoe

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409445418

Category: Social Science

Page: 289

View: 968

Advancing the rising field of engaged or participatory anthropology that is emerging at the same time as increased opposition from Indigenous peoples to research, this book offers critical reflections on research approaches to-date. The engaged approach seeks to change the researcher-researched relationship fundamentally, to make methods more appropriate and beneficial to communities by involving them as participants in the entire process from choice of research topic onwards. The aim is not only to change power relationships, but also engage with non-academic audiences.

Practicing Ethnography

Practicing Ethnography

Author: Lynda Mannik

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781487593124

Category: Social Science

Page: 275

View: 700

This methods book is theoretically informed but practical in approach, and reflects the challenges and concerns of contemporary ethnography in North America. The authors emphasize an inductive, ethnographic approach to research. Each chapter offers an overview of a particular method, methodological issue, or research trend, followed by an extended ethnographic vignette--written exclusively for this volume--by contemporary anthropologists about their fieldwork experiences. These highly readable vignettes showcase how ethnography informs contemporary anthropological theory, offering a unique way to discuss major concepts, methods, and methodologies. "Try This" and "Possible Projects" sections encourage newcomers to anthropology to apply what they have learned in their own ethnographic experiences.

The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Anthropology

The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Anthropology

Author: Simon Coleman

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317590675

Category: Social Science

Page: 530

View: 324

The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Anthropology is an invaluable guide and major reference source for students and scholars alike, introducing its readers to key contemporary perspectives and approaches within the field. Written by an experienced international team of contributors, with an interdisciplinary range of essays, this collection provides a powerful overview of the transformations currently affecting anthropology. The volume both addresses the concerns of the discipline and comments on its construction through texts, classroom interactions, engagements with various publics, and changing relations with other academic subjects. Persuasively demonstrating that a number of key contemporary issues can be usefully analyzed through an anthropological lens, the contributors cover important topics such as globalization, law and politics, collaborative archaeology, economics, religion, citizenship and community, health, and the environment. The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Anthropology is a fascinating examination of this lively and constantly evolving discipline.

African-American Pioneers in Anthropology

African-American Pioneers in Anthropology

Author: Ira E. Harrison

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252067363

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 715

This pathbreaking collection of intellectual biographies is the first to probe the careers of thirteen early African-American anthropologists, detailing both their achievements and their struggle with the latent and sometimes blatant racism of the times. Invaluable to historians of anthropology, this collection will also be useful to readers interested in African-American studies and biography. The lives and work of: Caroline Bond Day, Zora Neale Hurston, Louis Eugene King, Laurence Foster, W. Montague Cobb, Katherine Dunham, Ellen Irene Diggs, Allison Davis, St. Clair Drake, Arthur Huff Fauset, William S. Willis Jr., Hubert Barnes Ross, Elliot Skinner