'Civilizing' Resource Investments and Extractivism

'Civilizing' Resource Investments and Extractivism

Author: Wolfram Laube

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 9783643910950

Category:

Page: 280

View: 630

Attempts to `civilize' the exploitation of natural and mineral resources are globally promoted. The body of rules and regulations -often the outcome of prolonged socio-environmental and political struggles- is impressive. However, the outcomes of their implementation are much less convincing. The chapters in this book show how international law is curtailing national and local regulation, while existing legislation is often watered-down, circumvented or reinterpreted with severe environmental, health and socio-economic impacts, particularly in the `global south'.

Vanishing Rice Fields

Vanishing Rice Fields

Author: Angelica Laura Lucia Wehrli

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 9783643803689

Category:

Page: 226

View: 271

The book delineates how the quest for wealth and belief manifests itself in contemporary Vietnam. Based on multi-local and longitudinal ethnographic research, the author examines how wealth is pursued by household members and entrepreneurs. The quest for belief is brought into relief through inquiry into how norms and values have been re-evaluated, altered, subverted or restored. Focusing on the taboo topic of female feticide, The study elucidates why some parents ultimately decide to commit feticide, and why others, especially entrepreneurs, refrain from it. The case of the entrepreneurs shows a possible way out of the "vicious circle" that leads to female feticide and perpetuates gender inequality.

Indigenous Life Projects and Extractivism

Indigenous Life Projects and Extractivism

Author: Cecilie Vindal Ødegaard

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319934358

Category: Environmental policy

Page: 282

View: 288

Exploring indigenous life projects in encounters with extractivism, the present open access volume discusses how current turbulences actualise questions of indigeneity, difference and ontological dynamics in the Andes and Amazonia. While studies of extractivism in South America often focus on wider national and international politics, this contribution instead provides ethnographic explorations of indigenous politics, perspectives and worlds, revealing loss and suffering as well as creative strategies to mediate the extralocal. Seeking to avoid conceptual imperialism or the imposition of exogenous categories, the chapters are grounded in the respective authors’ long-standing field research. The authors examine the reactions (from resistance to accommodation), consequences (from anticipation to rubble) and materials (from fossil fuel to water) diversely related to extractivism in rural and urban settings. How can Amerindian strategies to preserve localised communities in extractivist contexts contribute to ways of thinking otherwise?

The Political Economy of the Low-Carbon Transition

The Political Economy of the Low-Carbon Transition

Author: Peadar Kirby

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319625546

Category: Political Science

Page: 303

View: 204

This book addresses the global need to transition to a low-carbon society and economy by 2050. The authors interrogate the dominant frames used for understanding this challenge and the predominant policy approaches for achieving it. Highlighting the techno-optimism that informs our current understanding and policy options, Kirby and O’Mahony draw on the lessons of international development to situate the transition within a political economy framework. Assisted by thinking on future scenarios, they critically examine the range of pathways being implemented by both developed and developing countries, identifying the prevailing forms of climate capitalism led by technology. Based on evidence that this is inadequate to achieve a low-carbon and sustainable society, the authors identify an alternative approach. This advance emerges from community initiatives, discussions on postcapitalism and debates about wellbeing and degrowth. The re-positioning of society and environment at the core of development can be labelled “ecosocialism” – a concept which must be tempered against the conditions created by Trumpism and Brexit.

Political Ecology of Agriculture

Political Ecology of Agriculture

Author: Omar Felipe Giraldo

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030118242

Category: Political Science

Page: 150

View: 890

This study discusses an original proposal aimed at critically analyzing the power relations that exist in contemporary agriculture. The author endeavors herein to clarify some of the strategies that industrial agribusiness, in collusion with the state and multilateral structures, sets in motion in order to functionalize the lives of millions of farmers, so that their bodies, enunciations, and sensibilities can be repurposed in accordance with the dynamics of capital accumulation. The argument is based on the idea that agro-extractivism cannot be thought of exclusively as an economic-political and technological system, but as a complex interweaving of cultural meanings, aesthetics, and affections, which, amalgamated under the abstract name of "development", act as a support for the whole system's scaffolding. The book also explores the other side of the coin, describing how, and under what conditions, social movements are responding to the calamities generated by this model. The central thesis is that many ongoing agroecological processes are providing one of the most interesting guidelines at present for visualizing transitions towards post-development, post-extractivism, and the construction of multiple worlds beyond the sphere of capital. Political ecology of agriculture joins the calls that question the cultural project of modernity and the predatory sense imposed by the globalized food empire, and invites recognition of the importance of agroecology in the context of the end of the fossil-fuel era and the likely collapse of our industry-based civilization.

Indigenous Data Sovereignty and Policy

Indigenous Data Sovereignty and Policy

Author: Maggie Walter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000214284

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 527

This book examines how Indigenous Peoples around the world are demanding greater data sovereignty, and challenging the ways in which governments have historically used Indigenous data to develop policies and programs. In the digital age, governments are increasingly dependent on data and data analytics to inform their policies and decision-making. However, Indigenous Peoples have often been the unwilling targets of policy interventions and have had little say over the collection, use and application of data about them, their lands and cultures. At the heart of Indigenous Peoples’ demands for change are the enduring aspirations of self-determination over their institutions, resources, knowledge and information systems. With contributors from Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, North and South America and Europe, this book offers a rich account of the potential for Indigenous data sovereignty to support human flourishing and to protect against the ever-growing threats of data-related risks and harms.

Kin

Kin

Author: Thom van Dooren

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9781478022664

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 489

The contributors to Kin draw on the work of anthropologist Deborah Bird Rose (1946–2018), a foundational voice in environmental humanities, to examine the relationships of interdependence and obligation between human and nonhuman lives. Through a close engagement over many decades with the Aboriginal communities of Yarralin and Lingara in northern Australia, Rose’s work explored possibilities for entangled forms of social and environmental justice. She sought to bring the insights of her Indigenous teachers into dialogue with the humanities and the natural sciences to describe and passionately advocate for a world of kin grounded in a profound sense of the connectivities and relationships that hold us together. Kin’s contributors take up Rose’s conceptual frameworks, often pushing academic fields beyond their traditional objects and methods of study. Together, the essays do more than pay tribute to Rose’s scholarship; they extend her ideas and underscore her ongoing critical and ethical relevance for a world still enduring and resisting ecocide and genocide. Contributors. The Bawaka Collective, Matthew Chrulew, Colin Dayan, Linda Payi Ford, Donna Haraway, James Hatley, Owain Jones, Stephen Muecke, Kate Rigby, Catriona (Cate) Sandilands, Isabelle Stengers, Anna Tsing, Thom van Dooren, Kate Wright

Global Green Politics

Global Green Politics

Author: Peter Newell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108487092

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 271

View: 433

A comprehensive overview of the Green perspective on a range of global politics topics, including concrete strategies for achieving change.

Mapping, Managing, and Crafting Sustainable Business Strategies for the Circular Economy

Mapping, Managing, and Crafting Sustainable Business Strategies for the Circular Economy

Author: Rodrigues, Susana Serrano

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN: 9781522598879

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 401

View: 860

As the planet’s natural resources continue to be depleted, society’s environmental awareness has grown. Businesses especially are being coerced into incorporating more sustainable approaches to carrying out their activities. Organizations that develop sustainable business strategies that deliver enhanced value by radically reducing material inputs and engaging consumers on circular economy will be well-positioned for success. Mapping, Managing, and Crafting Sustainable Business Strategies for the Circular Economy is an essential reference source that discusses implementing sustainable business strategies as well as economic policies for the modern business era. Featuring research on topics such as global business, urban innovation, and cost management, this book is ideally designed for managers, operators, manufacturers, academics, practitioners, policymakers, researchers, business professionals, and students seeking coverage on utilizing natural resources in the most sustainable way.

Literature as a Lens for Climate Change

Literature as a Lens for Climate Change

Author: Rebecca L. Young

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781498594127

Category: Education

Page: 271

View: 281

This collection offers practical approaches to using literature as a lens for teaching about climate change. Contributors share their classroom experiences and reflections to urge educators at all levels to prepare students for the challenges of a climate-changed world.

Indigenous Revolution in Ecuador and Bolivia, 1990–2005

Indigenous Revolution in Ecuador and Bolivia, 1990–2005

Author: Jeffery M. Paige

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816540143

Category: Social Science

Page: 353

View: 306

Uprisings by indigenous peoples of Ecuador and Bolivia between 1990 and 2005 overthrew the five-hundred-year-old racial and class order inherited from the Spanish Empire. It started in Ecuador with the Great Indigenous Uprising, which was fought for cultural and economic rights. A few years later massive indigenous mobilizations began in Bolivia, culminating in 2005 with the election of Evo Morales, the first indigenous president. Jeffrey M. Paige, an internationally recognized authority on the sociology of revolutionary movements, interviewed forty-five indigenous leaders who were actively involved in the uprisings. The leaders recount how peaceful protest and electoral democracy paved the path to power. Through the interviews, we learn how new ideologies of indigenous socialism drew on the deep commonalities between the communal dreams of their ancestors and the modern ideology of democratic socialism. This new discourse spoke to the people most oppressed by both withering racism and neoliberal capitalism. Emphasizing mutual respect among ethnic groups (including the dominant Hispanic group), the new revolutionary dynamic proposes a communal worldview similar to but more inclusive than Western socialism because it adds indigenous cultures and nature in a spiritual whole. Although absent in the major revolutions of the past century, the themes of indigenous revolution—democracy, indigeneity, spirituality, community, and ecology—are critically important. Paige’s interviews present the powerful personal experiences and emotional intensity of the revolutionary leadership. They share the stories of mass mobilization, elections, and indigenous socialism that created a new form of twenty-first-century revolution with far-reaching applications beyond the Andes.

International Encyclopedia of Human Geography

International Encyclopedia of Human Geography

Author:

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780081022962

Category: Social Science

Page: 7242

View: 641

International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Second Edition embraces diversity by design and captures the ways in which humans share places and view differences based on gender, race, nationality, location and other factors—in other words, the things that make people and places different. Questions of, for example, politics, economics, race relations and migration are introduced and discussed through a geographical lens. This updated edition will assist readers in their research by providing factual information, historical perspectives, theoretical approaches, reviews of literature, and provocative topical discussions that will stimulate creative thinking. Presents the most up-to-date and comprehensive coverage on the topic of human geography Contains extensive scope and depth of coverage Emphasizes how geographers interact with, understand and contribute to problem-solving in the contemporary world Places an emphasis on how geography is relevant in a social and interdisciplinary context