Chance, Love, and Logic

Chance, Love, and Logic

Author: Charles Sanders Peirce

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803287518

Category: Philosophy

Page: 368

View: 333

Two of the most important and influential works by Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) here in one volume. The first marks the beginning of pragmatism. The second presents Peirce's innovative essays on scientific metaphysics. (Peirce was) "one of the most original thinkers and system builders of any time, and certainly the greatest philosopher the United States has ever seen".--Joseph Brent, biographer.

Chance, Love, and Logic

Chance, Love, and Logic

Author: Charles S. Peirce

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1330251687

Category: Philosophy

Page: 358

View: 926

Charles Sanders Peirce was one of America's greatest philosophical minds. A scientist, mathematician, chemist, and philosopher, he is known as the "father of pragmatism" and considered philosophy to be his most important pursuit. Chance, Love, and Logic: Philosophical Essays is a collection of Peirce's greatest works, containing the complete text of his books Illustrations of the Logic of Science and Love and Chance. The book opens with a preface written by editor Morris S. Cohen. In it, Cohen sets the stage for the work of Peirce, stating, "these essays are important as giving us the sources of a great deal of contemporary American philosophy." Indeed, Peirce's work is recognized as some of the most important philosophical writing ever produced by an American. An essay from Dr. John Dewey, whose work helps to contextualize the pragmatism of Peirce, concludes this collection. In between these bookends, it is the terrific essays of Peirce that make up the meat of this collection. His opening writings, The Fixation of Belief, How to Make Our Ideas Clear, and The Doctrine of Chances, are perhaps his most well-known and influential works, and serve to lay the groundwork for his concept of pragmatism. While any of Peirce's essays stand alone quite well, they become more powerful and prophetic when digested together. Charles Peirce writes in a clear and accessible manner. Readers need not be well-versed in philosophical writings in order to enjoy this book. Rather, these essays are a terrific entry point to the school of pragmatism and philosophy as a whole. As an excellent waypoint into the mind of one of America's greatest thinkers, this book is highly recommended for anybody remotely interested in philosophy, or how the world that surrounds us all can be organized and interpreted. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Cambridge Pragmatism

Cambridge Pragmatism

Author: Cheryl Misak

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191088964

Category: Philosophy

Page: 368

View: 258

Cheryl Misak offers a strikingly new view of the development of philosophy in the twentieth century. Pragmatism, the home-grown philosophy of America, thinks of truth not as a static relation between a sentence and the believer-independent world, but rather, a belief that works. The founders of pragmatism, Peirce and James, developed this idea in more (Peirce) and less (James) objective ways. The standard story of the reception of American pragmatism in England is that Russell and Moore savaged James's theory, and that pragmatism has never fully recovered. An alternative, and underappreciated, story is told here. The brilliant Cambridge mathematician, philosopher and economist, Frank Ramsey, was in the mid-1920s heavily influenced by the almost-unheard-of Peirce and was developing a pragmatist position of great promise. He then transmitted that pragmatism to his friend Wittgenstein, although had Ramsey lived past the age of 26 to see what Wittgenstein did with that position, Ramsey would not have like what he saw.

Model-Based Reasoning in Science, Technology, and Medicine

Model-Based Reasoning in Science, Technology, and Medicine

Author: Lorenzo Magnani

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783540719861

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 525

View: 648

The volume is based on papers presented at the international conference on Model-Based Reasoning in Science and Medicine held in China in 2006. The presentations explore how scientific thinking uses models and explanatory reasoning to produce creative changes in theories and concepts. The contributions to the book are written by researchers active in the area of creative reasoning in science and technology. They include the subject area’s most recent results and achievements.

The Platonic Tradition in Anglo-Saxon Philosophy

The Platonic Tradition in Anglo-Saxon Philosophy

Author: John H. Muirhead

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317239727

Category: Philosophy

Page: 446

View: 872

Originally published in 1931, Muirhead’s study aims to challenge the view that Locke’s empiricism is the main philosophical thought to come out of England, suggesting that the Platonic tradition is much more prominent. These views are explored in detail in this text as well as touching on its development in the nineteenth century from Coleridge to Bradley and discussions on Transcendentalism in the United States. This title will be of interest to students of Philosophy.

American Thought

American Thought

Author: Morris Cohen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351532297

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 115

What constitutes American thought is obviously too elusive to be encompassed by any one writer or group of writers. The best that any attempt at intellectual history can achieve is to indicate some of its traces in written records. This volume represents the eff orts of one of America's leading philosophers to do just that. He is uniquely qualified to do so, as his contemporary Sidney Hook well understood.As Cohen noted, most of what people say and write is dominated by linguistic forms or habits. Thus the dominance of the traditions and habits that make up the English language has been the strongest single infl uence in fashioning American thought as very largely a province of British thought - despite the Declaration of Independence and two wars. Cohen describes how American thought developed from its British roots. It deals with reflective thought, i.e. with thought that is conscious of its problems, of its methods and of the widest general bearings of the results obtained so far. The diverse subjects discussed range from religious thinking to the scientific, and from the legal tradition to literary criticism.Among the important figures Cohen assesses are Dewey, Santayana, Holmes, Brandeis, Whitehead, James, and Royce as well as those of men less well-known but sometimes equally influential. In its scope and insight, this book takes its own unique and important place in American thought.

Social Darwinism in American Thought

Social Darwinism in American Thought

Author: Richard Hofstadter

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807054628

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 325

Social Darwinism in American Thought portrays the overall influence of Darwin on American social theory and the notable battle waged among thinkers over the implications of evolutionary theory for social thought and political action. Theorists such as Herbert Spencer and William Graham Sumner adopted the idea of the struggle for existence as justification for the evils as well as the benefits of laissez-faire modern industrial society. Others such as William James and John Dewey argued that human planning was needed to direct social development and improve upon the natural order. Hofstadter's classic study of the ramifications of Darwinism is a major analysis of the social philosophies that animated intellectual movements of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era.

Philosophies of Crime Fiction

Philosophies of Crime Fiction

Author: Josef Hoffmann

Publisher: Oldcastle Books

ISBN: 9781843441403

Category: Philosophy

Page: 192

View: 533

Philosophies of Crime Fiction provides a considered analysis of the philosophical ideas to be found in crime literature - both hidden and explicit. Josef Hoffmann ranges expertly across influences and inspirations in crime writing with a stellar cast including Conan Doyle, G K Chesterton, Dashiell Hammett, Albert Camus, Borges, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler and Ted Lewis. Hoffmann examines why crime literature may provide stronger consolation for readers than philosophy. In so doing, he demonstrates the truth of Wittgenstein's claim that more wisdom is contained in the best crime fiction than in philosophical essays. Josef Hoffmann's combination of knowledge, academic acuity and enthusiasm makes this a must-have book for any crime fiction aficionado - with or without a philosophical nature.

The Mysterious Barricades

The Mysterious Barricades

Author: Ann E. Berthoff

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802047068

Category: Philosophy

Page: 228

View: 539

The Mysterious Barricades criticizes the misconceptions of post-structuralism and then moves on to the reclamation of criticism as a philosophical activity concerned with how words work.

Experience Music Experiment

Experience Music Experiment

Author: William Brooks

Publisher: Leuven University Press

ISBN: 9789462702790

Category: Music

Page: 292

View: 820

“Truth happens to an idea.” So wrote William James in 1907; and twenty-four years later John Dewey argued that artistic experience entailed a process of “doing and undergoing.” But what do these ideas have to do with music, or with research conducted in and through music—that is, with “artistic research”? In this collection of essays, fourteen very different authors respond with distinct and challenging perspectives. Some report on their own experiments and experiences; some offer probing analyses of noteworthy practices; some view historical continuities through the lens of pragmatism and artistic experiment. The resulting collection yields new insights into what musicians do, how they experiment, and what they experience—insights that arise not from doctrine, but from diverse voices seeking common ground in and through experimental discourse: artistic research in and of itself.