British Independent Bus & Coach Operators

British Independent Bus & Coach Operators

Author: Jim Blake

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781473857155

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 332

A pictorial history of Great Britain’s independent bus and coach fleets from the 1960s. During the 1960s, many independent bus and coach fleets existed in Britain, and each varied enormously in size and scope of operation. They ranged from major operators such as Barton Transport (Nottinghamshire); Lancashire United and West Riding who operated stage carriage services as well as coach fleets; or Wallace Arnold Tours of Leeds, a major coach touring company in Britain and Continental Europe; to small operators who possessed just a handful of vehicles. The latter were sometimes involved only in private hire work, for such things as outings to sporting events or theaters, school or industrial contracts or often a combination of both. Smaller operators were based throughout the country, sometimes in tiny villages but also in the heart of large cities. Often the smaller operators bought redundant buses and coaches from major operators, whether BET, BTC (Tilling) or municipal concerns, or London Transport. Many got bargains from the latter, with surplus RT and RTL double-deckers sold following the disastrous bus strike and service cuts of 1958. Conversely, redundant vehicles bought by independent fleets often brought types that came from as far away as Scotland to London and the southeast. In the 1960s, the oldest buses and coaches with independent fleets were those employed on school or industrial contracts. These were not subject to the rigorous tests governing those carrying fare-paying passengers, so could be kept going until they were literally falling apart! These were known as “non-PSVs,” i.e. non-public service vehicles. On the other hand, some very small independent fleets, often with the title “Luxury Coaches,” took great pride in their fleets. They would purchase new coaches every two or three years and keep them in immaculate condition. The net result was that British independent bus and coach operators in the 1960s had a fascinating variety of chassis and body makes and styles, as well as liveries. This book shows many of these as they were between fifty and sixty years ago.

British Independent Bus and Coach Operators

British Independent Bus and Coach Operators

Author: Jim Blake

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781473857179

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 632

During the 1960s, a large number of independent bus and coach fleets existed, which varied enormously in size and scope of operation. They ranged from major operators such as Barton Transport (Nottinghamshire); Lancashire United and West Riding who operated stage carriage services as well as coach fleets; or Wallace Arnold Tours of Leeds, a major coach touring company in Britain and Continental Europe; to small operators who possessed just a handful of vehicles. The latter were sometimes involved only in private hire work, for such things as outings to sporting events or theaters, school or industrial contracts or often a combination of both. Smaller operators were based throughout the country, sometimes in tiny villages but also in the heart of large cities. Often the smaller operators bought redundant buses and coaches from major operators, whether BET, BTC (Tilling) or municipal concerns, or London Transport. Many got bargains from the latter, with surplus RT and RTL double-deckers sold following the disastrous bus strike and service cuts of 1958. Conversely, redundant vehicles bought by independent fleets often brought types that came from as far away as Scotland to London and the south east. In the 1960s, the oldest buses and coaches with independent fleets were those employed on school or industrial contracts. These were not subject to the rigorous tests governing those carrying fare-paying passengers, so could be kept going until they were literally falling apart! These were known as ‘non-PSVs’, i.e. non-public service vehicles. On the other hand, some very small independent fleets, often with the title ‘Luxury Coaches’, took great pride in their fleets. They would purchase new coaches every two or three years and keep them in immaculate condition. The net result was that British independent bus and coach operators in the 1960s had a fascinating variety of chassis and body makes and styles, as well as liveries. This book shows many of these as they were between fifty and sixty years ago.

United Counties Buses

United Counties Buses

Author: David Beddall

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781526755551

Category: Transportation

Page: 224

View: 499

An informative history covering nearly a century of this British bus company, packed with facts and photos. United Counties Buses: A Fleet History begins by taking a brief look at the expansion of the United Counties Omnibus Company since its formation in September 1921 through its demise in October 2014. The company acquired over fifty independent operators between 1922 and 1938, giving it prominence in Northamptonshire and surrounding areas. May 1952 saw the fleet double in size with the acquisition of the Midland area of the Eastern National Omnibus Company, encompassing Bedfordshire, north Buckinghamshire, and north Hertfordshire. The National Bus Company split United Counties into three operating companies in 1986, United Counties, Luton & District and MK Citybus, halving the size of the fleet. After being acquired by the Stagecoach Group in 1987, the company was largely left untouched. The main focus of the book looks at the vehicles operated by the company, covering the numerous types operated by United Counties themselves. The various liveries, both fleet and advertising liveries, are also listed.

Bedford Buses and Coaches

Bedford Buses and Coaches

Author: Nigel R B Furness

Publisher: The Crowood Press

ISBN: 9781785002083

Category: Transportation

Page: 300

View: 924

Bedford Buses and Coaches provides a detailed review of the entire range of purpose-built Public Service Vehicle (PSV) bus and coach chassis that carried the Bedford name from 1931 until production ceased in 1986. Bedfords were once a familiar sight on the roads not only of the United Kingdom, but throughout the world. They were produced in such volume that the advertising slogan 'You see them everywhere' was quite legitmately adopted by Vauxhall Motors, the manufacturer of Bedford vehicles. Fully illustrated thoughout with hundreds of photographs, the majority in colour, the book includes detailed descriptions of the Bedford petrol and diesel engines and other manufacturers engines used in Bedford bus and coach chassis. Detailed specifications and production histories are given for all the full-size passenger chassis including the WHB/WLB, WTB, OB/OWB, SB, VAS, VAL, VAM, Y-series and the Venturer. Road tests and owners' experiences are covered along with advice on buying and restoring a Bedford bus or coach. This book will be of great interest to all bus enthusiasts and historians and is superbly illustrated with 200 colour and 50 black & white photographs.

Hertfordshire Buses

Hertfordshire Buses

Author: John Law

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 9781445669724

Category: Transportation

Page: 96

View: 613

The author has been living in Hertfordshire since the 1970s and has built up a fantastic collection of photographs of the county’s buses, the best of which are displayed here.

A-Z of British Bus Bodies

A-Z of British Bus Bodies

Author: James Taylor

Publisher: Crowood

ISBN: 9781847976390

Category: Transportation

Page: 192

View: 394

A-Z of British Bus Bodies sets out to offer a first port of call for anyone with an interest in those who built bus and coach bodies in Britain and Ireland between 1919 and 1975. From charabanc to service bus, from luxury coach to municipal double-decker, the sheer variety of public service vehicle (PSV) bodies is astonishing. The alphabetical listing of British bus body builders between 1919 - 1975 covers the well-known larger companies and small local companies, and is illustrated with period and modern images, including contemporary advertising material. It includes a substantial introduction looking at operators of the period, the body building process and the development of bus body building throughout the period. A comprehensive guide to bus bodies 1919-1975 and a valuable reference work for the bus enthusiast. Superbly illustrated with 300 colour and black& white photographs including period and modern images and contemporary advertising material. James Taylor has been researching and writing about motoring history for over thirty years and has been interested in classic buses since childhood.