Representing Australian Aboriginal Music and Dance 1930-1970

Representing Australian Aboriginal Music and Dance 1930-1970

Author: Amanda Harris

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501362941

Category: Music

Page: 208

View: 284

Shortlisted for the 2021 Prime Minister's Literary Award for Australian History. Representing Australian Aboriginal Music and Dance 1930-1970 offers a rethinking of recent Australian music history. Amanda Harris presents accounts of Aboriginal music and dance by Aboriginal performers on public stages. Harris also historicizes the practices of non-Indigenous art music composers evoking Aboriginal music in their works, placing this in the context of emerging cultural institutions and policy frameworks. Centralizing auditory worlds and audio-visual evidence, Harris shows the direct relationship between the limits on Aboriginal people's mobility and non-Indigenous representations of Aboriginal culture. This book seeks to listen to Aboriginal accounts of disruption and continuation of Aboriginal cultural practices and features contributions from Aboriginal scholars Shannon Foster, Tiriki Onus and Nardi Simpson as personal interpretations of their family and community histories. Contextualizing recent music and dance practices in broader histories of policy, settler colonial structures, and postcolonizing efforts, the book offers a new lens on the development of Australian musical cultures.

Critical Indigenous Studies

Critical Indigenous Studies

Author: Aileen Moreton-Robinson

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816532735

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 747

This is an edited volume with contributions by leading scholars on the central epistemological, theoretical, political, and pedagogical questions and debates that constitute the discipline of Indigenous Studies. The volume emerges from a 2012 symposium hosted by the Indigenous Studies Research Network at Queensland University of Technology. The volume is organized into three sections: the first section includes essays that interrogate the embeddedness of Indigenous studies within academic institutions; the essays in the second section explore the epistemology of the discipline; and the third section's essays are devoted to understanding the locales of critical inquiry and practice. Moreton- Robinson's introductory essay provides a brief history of the discipline.

Indigenous Studies: Breakthroughs in Research and Practice

Indigenous Studies: Breakthroughs in Research and Practice

Author: Management Association, Information Resources

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN: 9781799804246

Category: Social Science

Page: 773

View: 757

Global interest in indigenous studies has been rapidly growing as researchers realize the importance of understanding the impact indigenous communities can have on the economy, development, education, and more. As the use, acceptance, and popularity of indigenous knowledge increases, it is crucial to explore how this community-based knowledge provides deeper insights, understanding, and influence on such things as decision making and problem solving. Indigenous Studies: Breakthroughs in Research and Practice examines the politics, culture, language, history, socio-economic development, methodologies, and contemporary experiences of indigenous peoples from around the world, as well as how contemporary issues impact these indigenous communities on a local, national, and global scale. Highlighting a range of topics such as local narratives, intergenerational cultural transfer, and ethnicity and identity, this publication is an ideal reference source for sociologists, policymakers, anthropologists, instructors, researchers, academicians, and graduate-level students in a variety of fields.

Indigenous Studies and Engaged Anthropology

Indigenous Studies and Engaged Anthropology

Author: Professor Paul Sillitoe

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781472403087

Category: Social Science

Page: 289

View: 185

Advancing the rising field of engaged or participatory anthropology that is emerging at the same time as increased opposition from Indigenous peoples to research, this book offers critical reflections on research approaches to-date. The engaged approach seeks to change the researcher-researched relationship fundamentally, to make methods more appropriate and beneficial to communities by involving them as participants in the entire process from choice of research topic onwards. The aim is not only to change power relationships, but also engage with non-academic audiences.

An Australian Indigenous Diaspora

An Australian Indigenous Diaspora

Author: Paul Burke

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781785333897

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 731

Some indigenous people, while remaining attached to their traditional homelands, leave them to make a new life for themselves in white towns and cities, thus constituting an “indigenous diaspora”. This innovative book is the first ethnographic account of one such indigenous diaspora, the Warlpiri, whose traditional hunter-gatherer life has been transformed through their dispossession and involvement with ranchers, missionaries, and successive government projects of recognition. By following several Warlpiri matriarchs into their new locations, far from their home settlements, this book explores how they sustained their independent lives, and examines their changing relationship with the traditional culture they represent.

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Author: Chiara Minestrelli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317217534

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 420

This book investigates the discursive and performative strategies employed by Australian Indigenous rappers to make sense of the world and establish a position of authority over their identity and place in society. Focusing on the aesthetics, the language, and the performativity of Hip Hop, this book pays attention to the life stance, the philosophy, and the spiritual beliefs of Australian Indigenous Hip Hop artists as ‘glocal’ producers and consumers. With Hip Hop as its main point of analysis, the author investigates, interrogates, and challenges categories and preconceived ideas about the critical notions of authenticity, ‘Indigenous’ and dominant values, spiritual practices, and political activism. Maintaining the emphasis on the importance of adopting decolonizing research strategies, the author utilises qualitative and ethnographic methods of data collection, such as semi-structured interviews, informal conversations, participant observation, and fieldwork notes. Collaborators and participants shed light on some of the dynamics underlying their musical decisions and their view within discussions on representations of ‘Indigenous identity and politics’. Looking at the Indigenous rappers’ local and global aspirations, this study shows that, by counteracting hegemonic narratives through their unique stories, Indigenous rappers have utilised Hip Hop as an expressive means to empower themselves and their audiences, entertain, and revive their Elders’ culture in ways that are contextual to the society they live in.

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Author: Chiara Minestrelli

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317217541

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 629

This book investigates the discursive and performative strategies employed by Australian Indigenous rappers to make sense of the world and establish a position of authority over their identity and place in society. Focusing on the aesthetics, the language, and the performativity of Hip Hop, this book pays attention to the life stance, the philosophy, and the spiritual beliefs of Australian Indigenous Hip Hop artists as ‘glocal’ producers and consumers. With Hip Hop as its main point of analysis, the author investigates, interrogates, and challenges categories and preconceived ideas about the critical notions of authenticity, ‘Indigenous’ and dominant values, spiritual practices, and political activism. Maintaining the emphasis on the importance of adopting decolonizing research strategies, the author utilises qualitative and ethnographic methods of data collection, such as semi-structured interviews, informal conversations, participant observation, and fieldwork notes. Collaborators and participants shed light on some of the dynamics underlying their musical decisions and their view within discussions on representations of ‘Indigenous identity and politics’. Looking at the Indigenous rappers’ local and global aspirations, this study shows that, by counteracting hegemonic narratives through their unique stories, Indigenous rappers have utilised Hip Hop as an expressive means to empower themselves and their audiences, entertain, and revive their Elders’ culture in ways that are contextual to the society they live in.

Routledge Handbook of Critical Indigenous Studies

Routledge Handbook of Critical Indigenous Studies

Author: Brendan Hokowhitu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429802379

Category: Social Science

Page: 608

View: 173

The Routledge Handbook of Critical Indigenous Studies is the first comprehensive overview of the rapidly expanding field of Indigenous scholarship. The book is ambitious in scope, ranging across disciplines and national boundaries, with particular reference to the lived conditions of Indigenous peoples in the first world. The contributors are all themselves Indigenous scholars who provide critical understandings of indigeneity in relation to ontology (ways of being), epistemology (ways of knowing), and axiology (ways of doing) with a view to providing insights into how Indigenous peoples and communities engage and examine the worlds in which they are immersed. Sections include: • Indigenous Sovereignty • Indigeneity in the 21st Century • Indigenous Epistemologies • The Field of Indigenous Studies • Global Indigeneity This handbook contributes to the re-centring of Indigenous knowledges, providing material and ideational analyses of social, political, and cultural institutions and critiquing and considering how Indigenous peoples situate themselves within, outside, and in relation to dominant discourses, dominant postcolonial cultures and prevailing Western thought. This book will be of interest to scholars with an interest in Indigenous peoples across Literature, History, Sociology, Critical Geographies, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Native Studies, Māori Studies, Hawaiian Studies, Native American Studies, Indigenous Studies, Race Studies, Queer Studies, Politics, Law, and Feminism.

Ngapartji Ngapartji

Ngapartji Ngapartji

Author: Vanessa Castejon

Publisher: ANU Press

ISBN: 9781925021738

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 793

In this innovative collection, Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars from Australia and Europe reflect on how their life histories have impacted on their research in Indigenous Australian Studies. Drawing on Pierre Nora’s concept of ego-histoire as an analytical tool to ask historians to apply their methods to themselves, contributors lay open their paths, personal commitments and passion involved in their research. Why are we researching in Indigenous Studies, what has driven our motivations? How have our biographical experiences influenced our research? And how has our research influenced us in our political and individual understanding as scholars and human beings? This collection tries to answer many of these complex questions, seeing them not as merely personal issues but highly relevant to the practice of Indigenous Studies. I think this rich collection will become a landmark text and a favourite within Australian scholarship. I am keen to see it published so that I can recommend it to others — Professor Emerita Margaret Allen, Gender Studies and Social Analysis, University of Adelaide The idea was to explain the link between the history you have made and the history that has made you — Pierre Nora