Representing Australian Aboriginal Music and Dance 1930-1970

Representing Australian Aboriginal Music and Dance 1930-1970

Author: Amanda Harris

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501362941

Category: Music

Page: 257

View: 880

Shortlisted for the 2021 Prime Minister's Literary Award for Australian History. Representing Australian Aboriginal Music and Dance 1930-1970 offers a rethinking of recent Australian music history. Amanda Harris presents accounts of Aboriginal music and dance by Aboriginal performers on public stages. Harris also historicizes the practices of non-Indigenous art music composers evoking Aboriginal music in their works, placing this in the context of emerging cultural institutions and policy frameworks. Centralizing auditory worlds and audio-visual evidence, Harris shows the direct relationship between the limits on Aboriginal people's mobility and non-Indigenous representations of Aboriginal culture. This book seeks to listen to Aboriginal accounts of disruption and continuation of Aboriginal cultural practices and features contributions from Aboriginal scholars Shannon Foster, Tiriki Onus and Nardi Simpson as personal interpretations of their family and community histories. Contextualizing recent music and dance practices in broader histories of policy, settler colonial structures, and postcolonizing efforts, the book offers a new lens on the development of Australian musical cultures.

Critical Indigenous Studies

Critical Indigenous Studies

Author: Aileen Moreton-Robinson

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816532735

Category: Social Science

Page: 217

View: 220

Aileen Moreton-Robinson and the contributors to this important volume deploy incisive critique and analytical acumen to propose new directions for critical Indigenous studies in the First World. Leading scholars offer thought-provoking essays on the central epistemological, theoretical, political, and pedagogical questions and debates that constitute the discipline of Indigenous studies, including a brief history of the discipline.

Belonging Together

Belonging Together

Author: Patrick John Sullivan

Publisher: Aboriginal Studies Press

ISBN: 9780855757809

Category: History

Page: 161

View: 305

"Belonging Together describes current Indigenous affairs policy in Australia, concentrating on the period since the end of ATSIC in 2004. It provides a unique overview of the trajectory of current policy, with Sullivan advancing a new consolidated approach to Indigenous policy which moves beyond the debate over self-determination and assimilation. Instead, he suggests that the interests of Indigenous peoples, settlers and immigrants are fundamentally shared, and proposes adaptation on both sides, but particularly for the descendants of settlers and immigrants, to allow them to embrace the framing of their identity by Indigenous presence. Sullivan is also critical of the remote control of Indigenous lives from metropolitan centres, with long lines of bureaucratic oversight that are inherently maladaptive and inefficient, and he proposes regional measures for policy implementation and accountability. Belonging Together's empirical studies of current policy implementation advance the body of knowledge in the underdeveloped field of the anthropology of policy and public administration."--AIATSIS website.

The Wentworth Lectures

The Wentworth Lectures

Author: Robert Tonkinson

Publisher:

ISBN: UGA:32108058045777

Category: Aboriginal Australians

Page: 356

View: 166

The Wentworth Lectures are a reflection of the changing values in Australia's society and the evolution of ethical research in Australia. They are a fitting symbol of Australia's maturing nationhood and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the first peoples of the land. As well as their resilience and journey to reclaim and preserve their identity, their histories, their cultural heritage -- their stories. There have been eighteen Wentworth lecturers, all of whom have been given full rein as to the topic and content. A veritable who's who of Australian Indigenous studies, all deal to some extent with wider political, social and economic, and in some cases, religious, factors prevalent at the time of their writing. In effect the Institute's 'founding father', Bill Wentworth's vision has been acknowledged since by every Wentworth lecturer. His was a major contribution to what has become by far Australia's most important institution for the promotion of the cultures and achievements of Australia's Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders. In the early 1960s the common view was that something like a 'rescue mission' was needed; to make haste and 'get it all down' before it was 'too late'. People's overriding perception was of a continuing and accelerating loss of culture, and a general decline in the face of assimilatory pressures. However, in 1978, by the time of the inaugural Wentworth Lecture, delivered by eminent prehistorian, Dr Rhys Jones, the multidisciplinary field of Aboriginal Studies or Australian Indigenous Studies, was burgeoning, as it still does today. Mirroring that change, AIATSIS is now a world-renowned research, collecting and publishing organisation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, traditions, languages and history. Taken together, they provide a wellspring of ideas and a trajectory of the evolution of Indigenous Studies from the leading Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous intellectuals in the field. They include: - Dr Rhys Jones - Ms Margaret Valadian - Professor Ronald Berndt - Professor Les Hiatt - Professor John Mulvaney - Mr Ken Colbung - Professor Nic Peterson - Professor Marcia Langton - Professor Mick Dodson - Justice Robert French - Dr Raymattja Marika - Professor Pat Dodson - Professor Peter Sutton - Professor Martin Nakata - Professor Bob Tonkinson - Ms Terri Janke - The Hon. Michael Kirby - Dr Megan Davis.

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Author: Chiara Minestrelli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317217534

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 171

This book investigates the discursive and performative strategies employed by Australian Indigenous rappers to make sense of the world and establish a position of authority over their identity and place in society. Focusing on the aesthetics, the language, and the performativity of Hip Hop, this book pays attention to the life stance, the philosophy, and the spiritual beliefs of Australian Indigenous Hip Hop artists as ‘glocal’ producers and consumers. With Hip Hop as its main point of analysis, the author investigates, interrogates, and challenges categories and preconceived ideas about the critical notions of authenticity, ‘Indigenous’ and dominant values, spiritual practices, and political activism. Maintaining the emphasis on the importance of adopting decolonizing research strategies, the author utilises qualitative and ethnographic methods of data collection, such as semi-structured interviews, informal conversations, participant observation, and fieldwork notes. Collaborators and participants shed light on some of the dynamics underlying their musical decisions and their view within discussions on representations of ‘Indigenous identity and politics’. Looking at the Indigenous rappers’ local and global aspirations, this study shows that, by counteracting hegemonic narratives through their unique stories, Indigenous rappers have utilised Hip Hop as an expressive means to empower themselves and their audiences, entertain, and revive their Elders’ culture in ways that are contextual to the society they live in.

An Australian Indigenous Diaspora

An Australian Indigenous Diaspora

Author: Paul Burke

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781785333897

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 174

Some indigenous people, while remaining attached to their traditional homelands, leave them to make a new life for themselves in white towns and cities, thus constituting an “indigenous diaspora”. This innovative book is the first ethnographic account of one such indigenous diaspora, the Warlpiri, whose traditional hunter-gatherer life has been transformed through their dispossession and involvement with ranchers, missionaries, and successive government projects of recognition. By following several Warlpiri matriarchs into their new locations, far from their home settlements, this book explores how they sustained their independent lives, and examines their changing relationship with the traditional culture they represent.

History, Power, Text

History, Power, Text

Author: Timothy Neale

Publisher: UTS ePRESS

ISBN: 9780987236913

Category: Social Science

Page: 570

View: 268

History, Power, Text: Cultural Studies and Indigenous Studies is a collection of essays on Indigenous themes published between 1996 and 2013 in the journal known first as UTS Review and now as Cultural Studies Review. This journal opened up a space for new kinds of politics, new styles of writing and new modes of interdisciplinary engagement. History, Power, Text highlights the significance of just one of the exciting interdisciplinary spaces, or meeting points, the journal enabled. ‘Indigenous cultural studies’ is our name for the intersection of cultural studies and Indigenous studies showcased here. This volume republishes key works by academics and writers Katelyn Barney, Jennifer Biddle, Tony Birch, Wendy Brady, Gillian Cowlishaw, Robyn Ferrell, Bronwyn Fredericks, Heather Goodall, Tess Lea, Erin Manning, Richard Martin, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Stephen Muecke, Alison Ravenscroft, Deborah Bird Rose, Lisa Slater, Sonia Smallacombe, Rebe Taylor, Penny van Toorn, Eve Vincent, Irene Watson and Virginia Watson—many of whom have taken this opportunity to write reflections on their work—as well as interviews between Christine Nicholls and painter Kathleen Petyarre, and Anne Brewster and author Kim Scott. The book also features new essays by Birch, Moreton-Robinson and Crystal McKinnon, and a roundtable discussion with former and current journal editors Chris Healy, Stephen Muecke and Katrina Schlunke.

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Australian Indigenous Hip Hop

Author: Chiara Minestrelli

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317217541

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 571

This book investigates the discursive and performative strategies employed by Australian Indigenous rappers to make sense of the world and establish a position of authority over their identity and place in society. Focusing on the aesthetics, the language, and the performativity of Hip Hop, this book pays attention to the life stance, the philosophy, and the spiritual beliefs of Australian Indigenous Hip Hop artists as ‘glocal’ producers and consumers. With Hip Hop as its main point of analysis, the author investigates, interrogates, and challenges categories and preconceived ideas about the critical notions of authenticity, ‘Indigenous’ and dominant values, spiritual practices, and political activism. Maintaining the emphasis on the importance of adopting decolonizing research strategies, the author utilises qualitative and ethnographic methods of data collection, such as semi-structured interviews, informal conversations, participant observation, and fieldwork notes. Collaborators and participants shed light on some of the dynamics underlying their musical decisions and their view within discussions on representations of ‘Indigenous identity and politics’. Looking at the Indigenous rappers’ local and global aspirations, this study shows that, by counteracting hegemonic narratives through their unique stories, Indigenous rappers have utilised Hip Hop as an expressive means to empower themselves and their audiences, entertain, and revive their Elders’ culture in ways that are contextual to the society they live in.