Archaeology to Delight and Instruct

Archaeology to Delight and Instruct

Author: Heather Burke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315433639

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 125

This book presents novel and interesting ways of teaching archaeological concepts and processes to college and university students. Seeking alternatives to the formal lecture format, the various contributions seek better ways of communicating the complexities of human behavior and of engaging students in active learning about the past. This collection of imaginative exercises designed by 20 master instructors on three continents includes role-playing, games, simulations, activities, and performance, all designed to teach archaeological concepts in interesting and engaging ways.

Doing Archaeology

Doing Archaeology

Author: Donald Henson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136272424

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 581

Covering archaeology from a range of angles, incorporating history, major themes, theories and methods, Doing Archaeology provides a firm grounding for anyone interested in learning more about the discipline. Throughout the book, key information is accessibly presented and important questions are answered, including: What is archaeology? How did archaeology begin? How can archaeology tell us about the past? How can archaeology tell how people use space and the landscape? How can we use the past to understand people? How do archaeology and ‘heritage’ interact? What role does archaeology play in society today? How do we practice archaeology? Drawing on the experiences of practising archaeologists, with engaging examples and studies from sites around the world, this book gives the reader a sense of what is it to study archaeology and be an archaeologist. An essential text for students studying A-Level archaeology, those considering or beginning a degree/foundation degree in archaeology, and those of all ages interested in volunteering or becoming involved in archaeological projects.

Sharing Archaeology

Sharing Archaeology

Author: Peter Stone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317800965

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 383

As a discipline, Archaeology has developed rapidly over the last half-century. The increase in so-called ‘public archaeology,’ with its wide range of television programming, community projects, newspaper articles, and enhanced site-based interpretation has taken archaeology from a closed academic discipline of interest to a tiny minority to a topic of increasing interest to the general public. This book explores how archaeologists share information – with specialists from other disciplines working within archaeology, other archaeologists, and a range of non-specialist groups. It emphasises that to adequately address contemporary levels of interest in their subject, archaeologists must work alongside and trust experts with an array of different skills and specializations. Drawing on case studies from eleven countries, Sharing Archaeology explores a wide range of issues raised as the result of archaeologists’ communication both within and outside the discipline. Examining best practice with wider implications and uses beyond the specified case studies, the chapters in this book raise questions as well as answers, provoking a critical evaluation of how best to interact with varied audiences and enhance sharing of archaeology.

Archaeological Field Schools

Archaeological Field Schools

Author: Jane Eva Baxter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315434520

Category: Education

Page: 193

View: 130

The field school is often described as a “rite of passage” among archaeologists. They are considered essential for the appropriate training of students for academic or professional archaeological careers, and are perhaps the only universal experience in an increasingly diverse array of archaeological career paths. Jane Baxter’s practical guide about how to run a successful field school offers archaeologists ways to maximize the educational and training benefits of these experiences. She presents a wide range of pedagogical theories and techniques that can be used to place field schools in an educational, as well as an archaeological, context. Baxter then offers a “how to” guide for the design of field schools, including logistical, legal, and personnel issues as well as strategies for integrating research and teaching in the field. Replete with checklists, forms, and cogent examples, the author gives directors and staff a set of “best practices” for designing and implementing a school.

Assembling Archaeology

Assembling Archaeology

Author: Hannah Cobb

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198784258

Category: Education

Page: 227

View: 277

Assembling Archaeology provides a radical rethinking of the relationships between teaching, researching, digging, and practicing as an archaeologist in the 21st century. The issues addressed here are global and applicable wherever archaeology is taught, practiced, and researched. At its heart this book addresses the undervaluation of teaching, demonstrating that this affects the fundamentals of contemporary archaeological practice and is particularly connected to the lack of diversity in disciplinary demographics. It proposes a solution which is grounded in a theoretical rethinking of archaeological teaching, training, and practice by advocating a holistic 'assemblage' approach which challenges traditional power structures and the global marketization of the higher education system. Drawing on insights from archaeology's current material turn, this book approaches the discipline as a subject of investigation and offers a new perspective founded upon the notion of the learning assemblage, which resituates teaching and learning as a central focus and contributes to broader discourses on critical pedagogy and rhizomatic learning. It ultimately argues for a robust archaeological pedagogy that is rooted in and emergent from the material realities of the profession, and will be valuable to everyone from academia to Cultural Resource Management (CRM), heritage professional to undergraduate student.

Archaeology and Capitalism

Archaeology and Capitalism

Author: Yannis Hamilakis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315434209

Category: Art

Page: 299

View: 885

The contributors to this volume focus on the inherent political nature of archaeology and its relationship to power, and explore how archaeologists can become more overtly agents of social change for individuals and communities.

Archaeology in Society

Archaeology in Society

Author: Marcy Rockman

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1441998810

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 808

The practiceof archaeology has many different facets: from academia, to government, tocultural resource management, to public media. Considering the place of archaeology in society means understanding the rolesthat archaeology has in the present day and a sense of the contributions thatit can make in each of these areas, both now and in the future. Archaeologistscome to the field to pursue a variety of interests: teaching, examininghistory, preserving the environment, or studying a specialized time period orinterest. The outside world has a number of other expectations of archaeology:preservation, tourism, and education, to name but a few. From a broad and varied background, the editors have compiled a rare group ofcontributors uniquely qualified to address questions about the current state ofarchaeology and its relevance in society. There is no single answer to thequestion of how the field of archaeology should develop, and what it can do forsociety. Instead,the authors in this volume lay out the many ways in which archaeology isrelevant to the present day - considering, for example, climate change, energyexploration, warfare, national identity, the importance of stories and how theyare told, and how and why opportunities to engage with the past throughmuseums, digs, television, classes, and the print media have the formsthey currently do - creating a state-of-the-art tool for archaeologists, policymakers and the public alike to understand the work of many in the fieldand address the challenges we all face.

New Perspectives in Global Public Archaeology

New Perspectives in Global Public Archaeology

Author: Katsuyuki Okamura

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461403413

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 687

Since its very beginning, archaeology has in many senses always related to a much wider constituency than just archaeologists. This relationship between archaeology and the public has often been overlooked and constantly changes. Public archaeology, as a field of research and practice, has been developing since the 1970s in English-speaking countries, particularly in the United States, Britain, and Australia, and is today beginning to spread to other parts of the world. Global expansion of public archaeology comes with the recognition of the need for a careful understanding of local contexts, particularly the culture and socio-political climate. This volume critically examines the current theories and practices of public archaeology through relevant case studies from different regions throughout the world, including: Japan, China, South Korea, New Caledonia, South Africa, Senegal, Jordon, Italy, Peru, Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia. These case studies are examined from a wide variety of theoretical contexts, to provide a thorough and comprehensive guide to the state of public archaeology today, as well as implications for its future. As the theory and practice of public archaeology continues to change and grow, archaeology’s relationship with the broader community needs to be critically and openly examined. The contributions in this wide-ranging work are a key source of information for anyone practicing or studying archaeology in a public context.

Underwater and Maritime Archaeology in Latin America and the Caribbean

Underwater and Maritime Archaeology in Latin America and the Caribbean

Author: Margaret E Leshikar-Denton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315416083

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 855

The waters of Latin America and the Caribbean are rich with archaeological sites, including coastal settlements, defensive forts, freshwater sources, fishing-related activities, navigational aids, anchorages, harbours, ports, shipbuilding sites, shipwrecks and survivor camps. Tragically, treasure-hunting has had a deep impact on these maritime cultural resources, especially on shipwrecks. In the last 20 years, archaeologists have been fighting the battle against these treasure hunters in an attempt to preserve these resources as a source of cultural heritage, rather than allow them to be viewed solely as a means for financial reward. Case studies written primarily by Latin American and Caribbean archaeologists demonstrate exciting and cutting edge research, conservation, site preservation, and interpretation. As a result, this groundbreaking book documents the emerging research interests of maritime archaeologists in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Archaeology, Heritage, and Wellbeing

Archaeology, Heritage, and Wellbeing

Author: Paul Everill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000590104

Category: Psychology

Page: 304

View: 550

Archaeology, Heritage, and Wellbeing fills an important gap in the academic literature, bringing together experts from archaeology/ historic environment and mental health research to provide an interdisciplinary overview of this emerging subject area. The book, uniquely, provides archaeologists and heritage professionals with an introduction to the ways in which mental health researchers view and measure wellbeing, helping archaeologists and other heritage professionals to move beyond the anecdotal when evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of such initiatives. Importantly, this book also serves to highlight to mental health researchers the many ways in which archaeology and heritage can be, and are being, harnessed to support non-medical therapeutic interventions to improve wellbeing. Authentic engagement with the historic environment can also provide powerful tools for community health and wellbeing, and this book offers examples of the diverse communities that have benefited from its capacity to promote wellbeing and wellness. Archaeology, Heritage, and Wellbeing is for students and researchers of archaeology and psychology interested in wellbeing, as well as researchers and professionals involved in health and social care, social prescribing, mental health and wellbeing, leisure, tourism, and heritage management.

Landscapes of Clearance

Landscapes of Clearance

Author: Angele Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315425603

Category: Nature

Page: 222

View: 505

This volume examines landscapes that have been cleared of inhabitants—for economic, environmental, or socio-political reasons, by choice or by force—and the social impacts of clearance on their populations. Using cases from five continents, and ranging from prehistoric, through colonial and post-colonial times, the contributors show landscapes as meaningful points of contestation when populations abandon them or are exiled from them. Acts of resistance and revitalization are also explored, demonstrating the social and political meaning of specific landscapes to individuals, groups, and nations, and how they help shape cultural identity and ideology.Sponsored by the World Archaeological Congress