The Poem Lycidas in James Joyce's Ulysses

The Poem Lycidas in James Joyce's Ulysses

Author: Guido Scholl

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 9783640116393

Category:

Page: 36

View: 616

Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,5, University of Hannover (Englisches Seminar), course: Ulysses, 6 entries in the bibliography, language: English, comment: This paper works out how the poem Lycidas is interwoven especially with the opening Chapters of James Joyce's most popular work. It also takes a view on the rest of the book and on its formal setup., abstract: The references to other pieces of literature play an important role In James Joyce's "Ulysses." The title itself, alluding to Homer's Odyssey, is the first of such references to be found when reading the book. Other famous examples are Stephen Dedalus' treatment of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" and Chapter 12, which is a parody of different styles of literature. As the reader should expect of a work deeply concerned with religious matters, John Milton also is one of the poets whose works are frequently being referred to throughout "Ulysses." While the poems "Paradise Lost" and "Paradise Regained" (to a lesser degree also "Samson Agonistes") are those among Milton's poems which are used the most by Joyce, the poem "Lycidas" plays a central role in the 2nd chapter. The fact that it is placed so early in the book makes the poem's meaning to the book very special, even more so, as one has to keep in mind that the structure of "Ulysses" is elementary for the understanding of its contents.

Ulysses and the Metamorphosis of Stephen Dedalus

Ulysses and the Metamorphosis of Stephen Dedalus

Author: Margaret McBride

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 0838754465

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 578

"This study therefore begins by focusing on the character of Stephen. Stephen is, significantly, a time-obsessed writer who wishes to obtain the time-transcending status of an Ovid or a Homer. When the wider tale is examined in terms of Stephen's ambition, Ulysses emerges as, potentially, a "self-begetting" work - that is, the finished narration can be read as a creation of the aspiring writer featured within the narrative itself."--BOOK JACKET.

The Value of James Joyce

The Value of James Joyce

Author: Margot Norris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107131927

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 665

This book explores the writings of James Joyce from his early poetry and short stories to his final avant-garde work, Finnegans Wake. It examines not only the significance of the ordinary but the function of natural and urban spaces and the moods, voice, and language that give Joyce's works their widespread appeal.

The Guide to James Joyce's Ulysses

The Guide to James Joyce's Ulysses

Author: Patrick Hastings

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421443508

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 468

The Guide to James Joyce's 'Ulysses' is perfect for anyone undertaking a reading of Joyce's novel, whether as a student, a member of a reading group, or a lover of literature finally crossing this novel off the bucket list.

Ulysses

Ulysses

Author: James Joyce

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 0141197412

Category: Dublin (Ireland)

Page: 1296

View: 678

Joyce's experimental masterpiece set a new standard for modernist fiction, pushing the English language past all previous thresholds in its quest to capture a day in the life of an Everyman in turn-of-the-century Dublin. Obliquely borrowing characters and situations from Homer's Odyssey, Joyce takes us on an internal odyssey along the current of thoughts, impressions, and experiences that make up the adventure of living an average day ...

Saul Steinberg's Literary Journeys

Saul Steinberg's Literary Journeys

Author: Jessica R. Feldman

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813945125

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 334

View: 323

Saul Steinberg’s inimitable drawings, paintings, and assemblages enriched the New Yorker, gallery and museum shows, and his own books for more than half a century. Although the literary qualities of Steinberg’s work have often been noted in passing, critics and art historians have yet to fathom the specific ways in which Steinberg meant drawing not merely to resemble writing but to be itself a type of literary writing. Jessica R. Feldman's Saul Steinberg’s Literary Journeys, the first book-length critical study of Steinberg’s art and its relation to literature, explores his complex literary roots, particularly his affinities with modernist aesthetics and iconography. The Steinberg who emerges is an artist of far greater depth than has been previously recognized. Feldman begins her study with a consideration of Steinberg as a reader and writer, including a survey of his personal library. She explores the practice of modernist parody as the strongest affinity between Steinberg and the two authors he repeatedly claimed as his "teachers"—Vladimir Nabokov and James Joyce. Studying Steinberg’s art in tandem with readings of selected works by Nabokov and Joyce, Feldman explores fascinating bonds between Steinberg and these writers, from their tastes for parody and popular culture to their status as mythmakers, émigrés, and perpetual wanderers. Further, Feldman relates Steinberg’s uniquely literary art to a host of other authors, including Rimbaud, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Gogol, Tolstoy, and Defoe. Generously illustrated with the artist’s work and drawing on invaluable archival material from the Saul Steinberg Foundation, this innovative fusion of literary history and art history allows us to see anew Steinberg’s art.

Multilingualism in Modernist Fiction

Multilingualism in Modernist Fiction

Author: J. Taylor-Batty

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137367969

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 235

View: 303

This new study argues that modernist literature is characterised by a 'multilingual turn'. Examining the use of different languages in the fiction of a range of writers, including Lawrence, Richardson, Mansfield, Rhys, Joyce and Beckett, Taylor-Batty demonstrates the centrality of linguistic plurality to modernist forms of defamiliarisation.

Laying Out the Bones

Laying Out the Bones

Author: Bridget English

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815654148

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

View: 380

English sheds new light on death and dying in twentieth- and twenty-first century Irish literature as she examines the ways that Irish wake and funeral rituals shape novelistic discourse. She argues that the treatment of death in Irish novels offers a way of making sense of mortality and provides insight into Ireland’s cultural and historical experience of death. Combining key concepts from narrative theory—such as readers’ competing desires for a story and for closure—with Irish cultural analyses and literary criticism, English performs astute close readings of death in select novels by Joyce, Beckett, Kate O’Brien, John McGahern, and Anne Enright. With each chapter, she demonstrates how novelistic narrative serves as a way of mediating between the physical facts of death and its lasting impact on the living. English suggests that while Catholic conceptions of death have always been challenged by alternative secular value systems, these systems have also struggled to find meaningful alternatives to the consolation offered by religious conceptions of the afterlife.

Handbook of the English Novel of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

Handbook of the English Novel of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

Author: Christoph Reinfandt

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110393361

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 613

View: 657

The Handbook systematically charts the trajectory of the English novel from its emergence as the foremost literary genre in the early twentieth century to its early twenty-first century status of eccentric eminence in new media environments. Systematic chapters address ̒The English Novel as a Distinctly Modern Genreʼ, ̒The Novel in the Economy’, ̒Genres’, ̒Gender’ (performativity, masculinities, feminism, queer), and ̒The Burden of Representationʼ (class and ethnicity). Extended contextualized close readings of more than twenty key texts from Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (1899) to Tom McCarthy’s Satin Island (2015) supplement the systematic approach and encourage future research by providing overviews of reception and theoretical perspectives.

James Joyce

James Joyce

Author: James F. Broderick

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476666938

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 183

View: 790

Though he published just a handful of major works in his lifetime, James Joyce (1882-1941) continues to fascinate readers around the world and remains one of the most important literary figures of the 20th century. The complexity of Joyce's style has attracted--and occasionally puzzled--generations of readers who have succumbed to the richness of his literary world. This literary companion guides readers through his four major works--Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake--with chapter-by-chapter discussions and critical inquiry. An A to Z format covers the works, people, history and context that influenced his writing. Appendices summarize notable Joycean literary criticism and biography, and also discuss significant films based on his work.